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Leadership Vol. 41, No. 4 • March/April 2012 Features


8 Defining success: Women in school leadership The principalship is where the rubber meets the road. Here, three female principals share the leadership skills and strategies that spell success for their schools. By Minerva Gandara, Kim Hendricks and Teresa López Alonzo


Columns


7 To our readers Families and communities are also part of the solution for closing the gap. By Alice Petrossian


23 Creating schools with high collective efficacy


Research is clear about what is needed to lead a school where the best teachers demand to be on the leader- ship team, and students know they will be successful. By George Manthey


12 Bullying and bias: Making schools safe for gay students Students on campuses with Gay Straight Alliances are more likely to report feeling safe at school, and less likely to be exposed to bias-related harassment. By James Fleming


16 Building parent trust in the special education setting Educators and parents of children with special needs must work together to change school culture and move from conflict to collaboration. By Laurie Wellner


20 It’s up to us: Bridging the civic opportunity gap Research shows that socio-economic status often determines a student’s opportunity to engage in civic learning. Schools must prepare all students to become responsible citizens and problem-solvers. By Michelle M. Herczog


28 Community schools: A full-spectrum resource Meeting the needs of the whole child is the goal of community schools, which partner with other agencies to offer a range of services and opportunities. By David Gomez, Lisa Gonzales, Deanna Niebuhr and Lisa Villarreal


32 A better way to motivate achievement Many low-income, minority schools in California are within 100 points of closing the achievement gap, a prize worth working for no matter how inconvenient, uncomfortable or risky. By Dennis Parker


36 Healthy strategies for school and community success Educators’ efforts to connect with social agencies and the medical community can help determine how successful, productive and healthy students will be now and later in life. By Walter L. Buster


March/April 2012


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