This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
FEATURE


These highly conscious, educational actions are having an impact on budding designers, helping them to get off on the right eco-foot before they even enter the industry. What is encouraging about eco-fashion is that there is more than just one way to go about it. Some larger fashion enterprises have the fi- nancial luxury of using greener textiles in pro- duction. Sustainable fabrics such as bamboo, hemp, organic wool or cotton are becoming more and more common on the catwalks. But smaller scale initiatives are in style too. After all – fashion is all about creativity.


We’re seeing a growing number of small shops and boutiques everywhere that are dedicated to taking the vast amount of clothing items that already exist, and using a keen creative eye to transform them into the most current trends in the industry. And beyond repurposing actual clothing, some forward-thinking fash- ionistas (including several celebrities) are seen sporting bags made from recycled juice boxes and rubber tires, or jewelry made from glass mason jars. Quicker than you think, recycled fashion is becoming a chic must-have.


Not surprisingly, the fashion industry has a lot of money. And those who have the big- time dough to make a big-time difference are kickstarting various large-scale, highly visible initiatives all over the world. A few years ago, U2 frontman Bono and his wife, Ali Hewson launched Edun, a stylish clothing collection that aims to foster sustainable employment in developing areas of the world, particularly Af- rica. This fashion- and socially-conscious col- lection is currently produced in India, Peru, Tu- nisia, Kenya, Uganda, Lesotho, Mauritius, and Madagascar. Closer to home, another project that has gained considerable notoriety is the bi-annual Eco-Fashion Week in Vancouver, hosted by Ave- da. A full week of seminars, trade exhibits and of course, runway shows – Aveda’s Eco-Fashion Week is taking big steps in changing consum-


40 avef summer 2011


ers’ perception of fashion with a conscience. Whether it’s an awareness campaign about the movement itself, or a newly launched, sought- after line of green clothing – these high-profile projects are beginning to set a conscious tone for the entire industry. Well-known designers and media in devel- oped countries are making real efforts to raise consumer awareness of the importance of green fashion. From employing non-toxic dry- cleaning techniques to using recycled price tags – the opportunities to make greener fash- ion choices are everywhere. But the power to make big changes lies in us. Not the designers. Generation Y and Millenials represent approxi- mately $520 billion in annual buying power -


If we don’t demand it, they can’t design it.”


translating to an astronomical influence over the industry. But in order to influence a green fashion world – we consumers have to want it. If we don’t demand it, they can’t design it. Shoppers, trendsetters and followers, and re- ally anyone who loves fashion are the ones who need to speak up and say “YES. Give us GREEN!” For those of you who wonder how good you can look wearing eco-fashion, think of it this way: Smart is ALWAYS sexy. And now there’s a movement that lets you have both. Points for the ensemble. Points for the environ- ment. Who doesn’t want to look like a model with a mind? Let’s turn that eco-footprint from a loafer to a pump.


opposite page, Photo, Hair & Makeup: Alcides Munoz jr.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80