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28 Money Product or Service


Funeral Services


Coffins & Urns (Purchased Separate from Funeral Services)


Fitness Trainer


Hair Stylist, Spa Services, Barber, Esthetician Services


Cigarettes & Other Tobacco Products


Financial Services #


The British Columbia government has decided that essentials such as gasoline and diesel for vehicles should not be taxed at the higher HST rate and has kept these items at the previous rate of 5%. Home heating fuel such as oil has also been left at the previous rate of 5%.


In contrast Ontario made the decision to tax gasoline, diesel and heating fuel at the full HST rate and so Ontarians will be paying an additional 8% for these “essentials”. One area where Ontarians are better off is at your local Tim’s. Prepared foods and beverages costing $4.00 or under (from any establishment) will only attract 5% tax whereas in British Columbia the full 12% HST will be applied.


Government Help


Each province has recognized that initially families may see an increase in their day-to-day purchases and have put in place some rebates and benefits. In British Columbia, families with incomes under $25,000, or individuals with incomes under $20,000 will receive a $230 credit. In Ontario individuals with a net income of $80,000 or less will receive a $300 credit paid in three $100 installments in June & December 2010 and June 2011. Families with a net income of $160,000 or less will receive a $1,000 credit paid in three installments: $330 in June 2010, $335 in Dec 2010 and a final payment of $335 in June 2011. Certain conditions apply to these credits such as filing income tax returns before certain dates etc.


It may seem at first glance that Ontario is getting a better deal from these rebates, however with items such as gasoline and heating fuels increasing by a full 8% people in this province will see a greater increase in their day- to-day spending than many in British Columbia. This is reflected in the payments.


For full details of the HST and how it might affect you please visit the following websites:


Ontario Ministry of Revenue: www.rev.gov.on.ca/en/taxchange/


What’s taxable & What’s Not in Ontario (pdf) http://www.rev.gov.on.ca/en/taxchange/pdf/taxable.pdf


Ontario before July 1, 2010


5% GST


Ontario after July 1, 2010


13% HST - increase of 8%


5% GST + 8% PST 13% HST - no change


5% GST 5% GST 5% GST Nicotine Replacement Products 5% GST No PST or GST


13% HST - increase of 8%


13% HST - increase of 8%


13% HST - increase of 8%


13% HST - increase of 8%


British Columbia before July 1, 2010


5% GST


British Columbia after July 1, 2010


12% HST - increase of 7%


5% GST + 7% PST 12% HST - no change


5% GST 5% GST 5% GST 5% GST No HST - no change No PST or GST


12% HST - increase of 7%


12% HST - increase of 7%


12% HST - increase of 7%


12% HST - increase of 8%


No HST - no change


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