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Avebury WF by Adamant who is by Abundance.

By Amber Heintzberger

Eventing is changing and with it, the horses that succeed at this demanding sport are also changing. For the American Warmblood stallion Avebury WF, a formal approval process is a critical part to his success along with his recent accomplishments in eventing.

and tracks and steeplechase elements, Warmblood horses are giving the traditional Thoroughbred event horses a run for their money. As eventing dressage becomes more difficult with the standards of training higher and more competitive, show jumping courses grow ever bigger and cross-country courses become increasingly technical. As a result, event riders who want to stay competitive are quickly becoming familiar with Warmblood bloodlines, registries and approval processes. To give breeders incentives to adapt their programs,

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the U.S. Eventing Association (USEA) has added a series of “Future Event Horse” competitions to its roster, placing even more emphasis on breeding and young stock. With so much focus on breeding and bloodlines, it makes sense that breeders are interested in having their multi-talented stallions approved.

40 May/June 2010

he sport of eventing has changed dramatically over the past decade. With the introduction of the CIC “short format” that eliminates the roads

Made in America

American breeders have the option of

registering their horses with the two “home- grown” registries, the American Warmblood Society (AWS) or the American Warmblood Registry (AWR), or one of the many European registries with affiliated offices here in the United States. Often stallions are approved in more than one breed registry. Both the AWS and AWR are members of the World

Breeding Federation for Sport Horses (WBFSH). The WBFSH is the major connection between the breeding organizations of sport horses and the international equestrian federation (FEI). Both the AWR and the AWS aim to promote breeding of sport horses in America. The AWS tends to be more open to various breeds, especially draft blood, while the AWR limits draft blood to one quarter of the pedigree for driving. Breeder, dressage judge and former event rider Anne

Rawle of Watermark Farm in Oxford, Pennsylvania, has been involved with the American Warmblood Registry

All photos compliments of Watermark Farm.

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