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y five siblings and I agree that our parents, who are way past 65, should surely be retired by now. However, they love their careers and just can’t seem to make that “big decision.” Likewise many

sport horses love their jobs, and even though we may think their careers are over, sometimes they surprise us and communicate otherwise. My first dressage horse, for instance, lived to the ripe old age of 35 and was finally laid to rest a year ago. Not bad for a 16.1 hand Toroughbred cross who evented and later was a dressage horse into his 20s. He was an incredibly sound horse with a back made of steel and a challenging trot to sit. It was one of those bone-jarring-stomach- wrenching-don’t-dare-sit-this-trot-on-a-full-tummy trots—you know the type. Every day this energizer bunny gave me 110%, never acting his age under saddle and always eager to work. If it was leſt up to him, he probably would have never gone into retirement. My next dressage horse, a sweet giant Warmblood cross, one I raised and trained for eleven years, I sold as a

schoolmaster at age 13. His new owner and I regularly stayed in touch until one day she called to report that at 17 he was ready for retirement. So together we found him a great retirement home—actually the original breeder that I bought him from in 1993. Turns out he’s only semi-retired—he proved to still be full of life and good health, so he trail rides and fox hunts up in New England. He evidently made it clear that he was not quite ready to be put “out to pasture.” When Shamrock, our jumper on the cover, suffered a severe back injury from a bad fall, multiple vets gave

discouraging prognoses to the owners. Te news was nothing short of devasting and his owners’ patient, attentive approach to his eventual recovery is commendable. Likewise, the story of the dressage horse Drakensburg was a rocky climb to Grand Prix for Roberta Williams. In each case the owners made plans to retire their horse but, aſter careful “listening,” they learned that retirement was out of the question for these high-achievers. Since our first issue of Warmbloods Today, we have tried to listen to our readers and we appreciate all your

feedback thus far. As we wrap up our first year in print, we have a smorgasbord of stories and informative articles in this issue. Ever thought of buying a horse at auction? Why the sudden popularity of the Danish breed? Or how about the challenges of horse handling, or maybe understanding the pros and cons of frozen semen. Here’s an interesting concept: what about your horse coaching you? We were also able to uncover some great personal stories about eventing legend Jack LeGoff. So whether you’re a breeder, jumper, eventer or dressage person, we expect you’ll find quite a few articles to enjoy. And don’t forget that during the first half of the year, breeders are selecting stallions for their breeding program. As a result there are plenty of beautiful stallion ads to drool over. So as the new year is upon us, my wish is that it’s a special year where we all tune in and truly listen to our horses. You just might be surprised at what they have to say!

Liz Cornell, Publisher

Our Mission: Warmbloods Today is the only magazine in North America focused on the entire spectrum of Warmblood breeds. It’s a place where people from all aspects of the sport horse community can come together: amateurs, owners, trainers and breeders. Each issue contains interesting, informative and often heart-warming stories of peoples’ experiences with their horses, along with thought-provoking opinions from various professionals and amateurs. We cover all horses from European descent bred for the sports of jumping, dressage, eventing and driving including the Iberian breeds and American Warmbloods.

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