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FRYERS 


Gas fryers continue to be among the most popular of all commercial cooking appliances. They are


     models, and as drop-in units.


     most common type used today. Full-size fryers typically have shortening capacities of 35 to 210 pounds and production rates of 60 to 300 pounds of French fries per hour. They are available as single, stand-alone units or can be installed in multiples to create a fryer battery often in conjunction with product bagging or dump stations. They have steel legs or casters to facilitate cleaning.


Gas countertop fryers are receiving increased interest due to the premium placed on kitchen space and the trend to nontraditional venues such as C-stores and kiosks. The space under the fryer can be used for dry or refrigerated storage which can help reduce labor costs and production times. Countertop fryers are typically mounted on four inch legs. They have shortening capacities of 15 to 30 pounds and can produce 25 to 60 pounds of fries per hour.


Drop-in model fryers are designed


 steel countertop. The fry pots and burner systems are double walled and insulated to reduce radiated heat. Their streamlined uniform appearance can complement an open display kitchen. Oil capacities range from 25 to 80 pounds.


In recent years, manufacturers have developed more energy


     blower-assisted natural gas power burners, infrared burner technology


    exchangers designed to extract 


Another fairly recent development has been Low Oil Volume (LOV) fryers which address the problems associated with replacing existing oils with more expensive trans fat free alternatives. As the name


    use a smaller volume of oil to cook the same amount of product.


40 34th Edition FO ODSERVICE GAS EQUIPMENT CATALOG


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