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SAFETY IN THE PLANT


SMOOTHER, SAFER STOs


How a single-source approach can simplify safety and reduce costs during plant shutdowns


Wie ein Single- Source-Ansatz die Sicherheit vereinfachen und die Kosten bei Abschaltungen der Anlage reduzieren kann


Comment une approche à source unique peut simplifier la sécurité et réduire les coûts pendant des fermetures d’usine


P


Using a single safety provider helps planned shutdowns run smoothly


lanned STOs (shutdowns, turnarounds and outages) are often scheduled for preventative maintenance and new equipment


installation that must be performed to keep a plant running and in regulatory compliance. To minimise production downtime, this work must be completed within a very tight timeframe. As such, STOs are often feats of engineering, planning and coordination – work that begins many months, even years, before the event. At the top of the list during any


planned shutdown is safety. To prevent injury or loss of life, reduce liability and


keep insurance rates in check, safety departments must provide the required safety training, products and services that will ensure that all on-site personnel and company assets are protected throughout the scope of the operation. Managing everything that encompasses ‘safety’ for an STO, however, is often a feat of its own. During an STO, a typical facility can


see its ranks swell from 50 to perhaps 200-300 additional workers that the safety department must properly equip, train and provide rescue and standby emergency services. This often requires managing multiple vendors of safety products and services as well as dealing


38 www.engineerlive.com


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