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Railfan for Life


Enjoy a rich journey across the American railroading landscape through the lens of Hal Carstens!


In this all-new collection, you’ll enjoy more than 100 pages of color photos selected by our editors spanning Hal’s trackside adventures from the last sixty years. From coast to coast, from steam to diesel (and trolleys, too), from main lines to short lines and everything in between!


HARDCOVER Item CRS-RFLH SOFTCOVER $34.95 $ 19.95 Item CRS-RFLS


Plus shipping & handling. Call or email for rates.


You won’t want to miss this special collection, order your copy today!


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WhiteRiverProductions.com 22 JULY 2015 • RAILFAN.COM


Los Angeles Metro crews at the new Foothill Gold Line Operations Campus in Monrovia, Calif., prepare one of their newest additions to the fl eet, a Kinkisharyo P3010 rail car that was displayed at the open house event that took place on May 23, 2015. This is fi rst of 78 cars to be delivered for the opening of the line in September. The Operations Campus is a full-service, state of the art fa- cility. It has the capacity to house and maintain up to 84 light rail vehicles and employs nearly 200 maintenance and operations staff over several shifts each day. The facility will operate 24 hours a day, seven days a week. — STEVE CRISE


Flashes


The NEW JERSEY TRANSIT station in Eliza- beth is to be completed in 2018. The new fa- cility will employ high-level platforms long enough to serve 12-car trains, and have abun- dant climate-controlled shelters to serve the needs of passengers at the busy station. The DETROIT STREET CAR PROJECT is


under way. Orange cones will be the prima- ry decoration this year along Woodward Av- enue as construction picks up the pace on the 3.3-mile line that will run from Campus Mauritius in downtown Detroit towards the New Center District. The six cars to be em- ployed will be built by the Inverkon Group of the Czech Republic. The cars may well be assembled in Michigan under the Buy-Amer- ica rules of the Federal Transit Administra- tion. A local area is being sought to build the technical center near the north end of the streetcar line at Woodward Avenue and West Grand Boulevard. The aim is to complete the project by late 2016. Expect to see lots of dirt flying in Detroit. Thanks to Kenneth Borg.


The TAMPA BAY STREETCAR has lost pa-


tronage in recent years and the reasons ap- pear to be that it doesn’t serve a useful pur- pose and has fares too high to attract riders. Mostly it appears to be a tourist attraction rather than a vital part of the transportation structure. Studies reveal that extending the route north to Tampa Heights would cost about $60 million. Federal funds would be very helpful, but the Tampa streetcar has too few patrons to qualify for federal transit aid. Careful planning has to be a priority if rail transit is to have a successful future role in the transportation picture of Tampa Bay. Thanks to Harry Ross. In Minnesota, MINNEAPOLIS METRO TRANSIT will offer riders on the North Star commuter rail service a guarantee of a full refund if a regularly scheduled weekday train arrives at its terminal point 11 or more minutes late. Five years in, Northstar has been plagued by delays and a recent dip in ridership. On-time performance was just 66% in 2014. Thanks to Sam Maroon.


PLEASE SEND light rail, transit, and commuter rail news items and correspondence directly to Prof. George M. Smerk, P.O. Box 486, Bloomington, IN 47402.


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