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Items on the banned list are there because WADA has determined that they meet at least two of the following three criteria:


■ Potential to enhance sport performance


■ Represents a health risk to the athletes


■ Violates the spirit of sport


First, you’ll have to find out if the substance in question is prohibited. You can find an updated drug list on the Global Drug Reference Online site, www.GlobalDRO.org or through the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency’s website, www.USADA.org.


If you have concluded that the substance you are using is in fact on the banned list, you’ll need to be able to show that you are eligible for a TUE.


To receive an exemption, you need to download the proper application form and the corresponding medical form information from USADA’s website and bring the forms to your physician. (NOTE: any TUE application that is submitted without proper medical documentation will not be processed.) All applications must be submitted with a complete medical history of your diagnosis, along with detailed treatment attempts with non-prohibited medications.


If you are planning to race this season, it is your responsibility to familiarize yourself with the banned substance list. And this year’s list has a few new substances, including one that might sound very familiar: pseudoephedrine.


If you’ve ever had a stuffy nose or common cold, you probably have some pseudoephedrine in your medicine cabinet right now. It’s also known by the more common name — cold medicine. Any athlete found with pseudoephedrine in their system during in-competition drug testing in 2015 will be subject to suspension.


Pseudoephedrine joins a list that also includes many other commonly used over-the-counter medications, including levmetamfetamine, an ingredient found in cold and fl u treatments.


If you frequently suffer from a stuffy nose though, you can breathe easy, literally. Cold medications are not banned out of competition. As long as you discontinue using any medication with pseudoephedrine or levmetamfetamine at least 24 hours before competition, the substances should be clear of your bloodstream, USADA said.


Another addition on the 2015 banned list is plasma donation. Under the WADA Code, as a plasma donor’s red blood cells are reintroduced to the system after the donation, it is considered to be a form of “blood doping.” However, plasmapharesis is not a violation because the individual is only receiving plasma with blood cells removed.


The bottom line is, before you reach the start line, get informed. No race organizer wants to take your hard work away from you because of an avoidable mistake. And if you think you’re eligible for a TUE, now is the time to get started on the paperwork.


 


Resources
Get answers to your questions regarding anti-doping.


www.usada.org: learn about TUEs, prohibited substances and more at the official site of the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency.
www.usatriathlon.org/antidoping:USA Triathlon’s informational Web source for all things anti-doping, including testing information, prohibited substances and supplements, FAQs, links and more.
www.wada-ama.org: World Anti-Doping Agency
USADA’s Athlete Express: 719-785-2000 or email: athleteexpress@usada.org


USATRIATHLON.ORG USA TRIATHLON 45

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