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The National Park, set up to protect the ecosystem of the Everglades, is a breeding ground for wading birds that live alongside the Florida panther, alligators, manatee and fish


they can explore the endangered animal’s natural habitats. And the Ten Thousand Island National Wildlife Refuge wraps a protective arm around its mangrove forests and creatures. Campsites are available all over the National Park, none more so than in the 729,000-acre (295 hectares) Big Cypress National Preserve, and its Oasis Visitor Center near Everglades City. Alligators, bald eagles and heron are among the animals and birds that inhabit this area. Of course, exploring the


Everglades does not necessarily mean camping under the stars. There are hotels and cabins available and many eating places to experience local fare, including fish and stone crab. After such a breathtaking brush with nature, many tourists are looking for the buzz of a city. Fort Lauderdale, one of the main cruise ports in Florida, is


also famous for its beaches, culture and shopping, in particular Sawgrass Mills, one of Florida’s premium outlets. And for a real feel of the big city there can only be one place in South Florida – Miami. What has Miami got? Everything, and on a grand scale. It is a leader in culture, the arts, entertainment, finance and


commerce. The Port of Miami is known as the Cruise Capital of the World and South Beach is the hub of everything that is cool! Allow several days to make the most of Miami. There are countless hotels and motels to suit every budget, bed and breakfast stopovers, campgrounds and resorts. Colourful festivals are part of city life. Calle Ocho is the largest street festival in Miami, held between February and March, and is a celebration of Latin life on the streets of Little Havana. Dance, music, street performers and home-cooked food are part of





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