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Conveying


New level of control


The application of innovative torque sensing technology is bringing a new level of control to demanding belt conveying applications. This has the potential to revolutionise the dry bulk handling process, with vastly improved effi ciency and cost- effectiveness.


Mark Ingham


laborious manual operation. Optimisation of the conveying process, however, is rarely considered or, if it is considered at all, is regarded as something of a black art. However, this is all set to change, thanks to the application of


B


non-contact digital torque monitoring, which has the potential to transform bulk materials conveying into a highly accurate and controlled procedure. When a belt conveyor is


empty, it requires very little power from the drive shaft to keep it moving smoothly. As the conveyor load increases –with heavier


material 14 September 2014 Solids and Bulk Handling www.solidsandbulk.co.uk


elt conveyors have long been vital components within bulk handling applications, and have transformed what was once a


and/ or a


greater


material density being conveyed, so more power is needed. Similarly, if the conveyor is run at a higher speed, so more power is needed.


Bulk handling operations in many applications such as ports and stockyards demand fast turn around times to ensure costs are minimised. Conveyors, therefore, need to be run at optimal speed regardless of the load. If the belt conveyor slows down as more bulk is added, then this is adding time and cost to the bulk handling process. In addition, the mechanical processes at the receiving end of the conveyor may well need a steady fl ow of material in order to operate effi ciently – or indeed safely. If the conveyor speeds up as the load is gradually reduced, then there is potentially a costly mechanical failure waiting to happen.


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