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NADIA EL MALLAKH XCEL ENERGY | Denver, Colo. E 30


very morning when Nadia El Mallakh passes through the doors of Xcel


Energy’s Denver offi ces, she experiences a rush of satisfaction. “I played a big part in an intensive eight-month negotiation to get this offi ce built and to make Xcel its lead tenant,” says El Mallakh. “And as an environmentally friendly building with LEED Platinum certifi cation, it refl ects both Xcel’s and my own values.” As assistant general counsel


at the multibillion-dollar utility holding company, El Mallakh focuses on real estate, negotiating utility franchise agreements with municipalities and supervising condemnation cases for land Xcel has acquired. She works with a variety of business units from governmental aff airs to regulatory. Her Egyptian father arrived in


the U.S. o n a Fulbright scholar- ship in the 1950s; her mother has a PhD. El Mallakh attributes much of her professional suc- cess to a basic tenet she learned at home: treat everyone with respect and dignity. “Respecting and listening to people creates a personal dynamic that helps to make me a happier person, and it defi nitely helps in my work,” she says. “It’s important to step back and hear what the client is trying to achieve. I enjoy working with them to reach their end goal while protecting the legal interest of the corporation.” Prior to Xcel, El Mallakh


(whose law degree is from the University of California, Berkeley)


was in private practice at the law fi rm of Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher in San Francisco and Denver. “At the fi rm I was working mostly on national deals and not rooted in the community. Going in-house allows me to be more of a local player. As a native Coloradoan, that’s important to me.”


Going in-house allows me to be more of a local player. As a native Coloradoan, that’s important to me.


DIVERSITY & THE BAR® MARCH/APRIL 2014


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