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NATASHA G. KOHNE A


s partner-in-charge of Akin Gump’s Abu Dhabi offi ce, Natasha Kohne is


member of a select group–there are very few women representing global law fi rms in the Mideast. “T e fi rm took a chance in giving me the position. Not just because of my gender but my age as well. I wasn’t the logical choice in a region that is more traditional. But to the credit of the mostly male United Arab Emirates business community, I’ve been very well received. T ey’ve demonstrated open-mindedness and appreciation for diversity.” Kohne’s job has many facets. In addition to representing the fi rm in


AKIN GUMP STRAUSS HAUER & FELD LLP | Abu Dhabi, UAE


Abu Dabi, she is responsible for her own international litigation prac- tice; maintaining client relations; business development; and human resources issues. Prior to joining the Abu


Dhabi offi ce, Kohne was an associate with Akin Gump in New York. “In coming here, I realized I had nothing to lose. I recognized an opportunity and went for it. Of course it was made possible by the support of my mentors and the fi rm’s intrin- sic entrepreneurial spirit.” Kohne, who graduated from


Harvard Law School in 2000, encourages younger attorneys to


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take a chance. She tells them that a legal career is no longer a linear journey. Sometimes they must be willing to get off the beaten track to get ahead. She credits her ongoing success to a willingness to adapt. “Adaptability is impor- tant,” she says. “And it’s important to anticipate and get in front of changes whenever you can.”


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Council on Access and Fairness


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