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BOYS YOUTH RULES RULE 5 — PERSONAL AND EJECTION FOULS


In keeping with the overarching emphasis on player safety and sportsmanship at the youth level, US Lacrosse expects stricter enforcement of the Cross Check, Illegal Body Check, Checks Involving The Head/Neck, Slashing, Unnecessary Roughness, and Unsportsmanlike Conduct rules than is common at the high school level.


ILLEGAL BODY-CHECK RULE 5 SECTION 3


US Lacrosse calls special attention to new (2014) NFHS RULE 5 SECTION 3, ILLEGAL BODY-CHECK, ARTICLE 5, which addresses the concept of a DEFENSELESS PLAYER:


ART. 5 . … A body-check that targets a player in a defenseless position. This includes but is not limited to: (i) body checking a player from his “blind side”; (ii) body checking a player who has his head down in an attempt to play a loose ball; and (iii) body checking a player whose head is turned away to receive a pass, even if that player turns toward the contact immediately before the body check.


PENALTY: Two- or three-minute non-releasable foul, at the official’s discretion. An excessively violent violation of this rule may result in an ejection.


US Lacrosse NOTE: Sports medicine research indicates that the severity of certain injuries may be reduced if a player can anticipate and prepare himself for an oncoming hit. Other sports medicine research indicates that peripheral vision may not be fully developed in many boys before approximately age fifteen. Game officials should be especially alert to blind side checks at all youth levels.


Add the following US Lacrosse Boys Youth Rules Articles to NFHS Rule 5 Section 3:


ART. 6 … TAKE-OUT CHECK/EXCESSIVE BODY-CHECK. Take-Out Checks/ Excessive Body-Checks are prohibited at every age level. A Take-Out Check/ Excessive Body-Check is defined as:


Any body-check in which the player lowers his head or shoulder with the force and intent to put the other player on the ground.


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BOYS YOUTH RULES GUIDEBOOK


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