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BOYS YOUTH RULES


SPORTSMANSHIP – Unsportsmanlike conduct by coaches and/or players and/or spectators degrades the experience of youth players and erodes the integrity and appeal of the sport. Therefore, unsportsmanlike conduct will not be tolerated. Obscenities need not be used in order for language to draw a penalty. Tone, intent, and body language can all contribute to unsportsmanlike conduct. Players, coaches, and spectators should exhibit the highest level of sportsmanship at all times. US Lacrosse expects officials to enforce the Unsportsmanlike Conduct rules without hesitation, and further expects coaches to promote good sportsmanship among players and anybody associated with the team, including spectators, and to support officials in maintaining an environment of civility and sportsmanship


US Lacrosse initiated the Sideline Manager and Sportsmanship Card program in an effort to invest the lacrosse community with responsibility for seeing that good sportsmanship is the rule, rather than the exception, in the sport of lacrosse. When used in conjunction with the rules, the Sportsmanship Card procedures serve as an effective deterrent to abusive behaviors. The program was created with the goal of establishing constraints that should:


1. eradicate the “unsportsmanlike behavior” that is creeping into sport,


2. strengthen sportsmanship,


3. contribute to the retention of officials, and


4. honor the game.


US Lacrosse encourages leagues and local programs to utilize the Sideline Manager and Sportsmanship Card program, details of which can be found at uslacrosse.org/sportsmanshipcard.


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BOYS YOUTH RULES GUIDEBOOK


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