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IN CLOSING... Q 48


Paul Loh is a founding member of Willenken Wilson Loh & Delgado LLP. He has tried over 40 jury trials to verdict. He spoke to Diversity & the Bar about his fi rm and his career.


DIVERSITY & THE BAR® MAY/JUNE 2013


You practiced at an AmLaw 100 litigation fi rm. What did you learn from the Big Law experience?


For purposes of starting and running my fi rm, the most useful thing I learned from the Big Law experience is the importance of having formal systems, policies, and accountability. I’ve seen many smart people I know who started or run small fi rms falter or struggle because they focused only on “getting the case” or thought that a small fi rm can be managed with informal or loose rules. A small fi rm is still a business. To thrive, a small fi rm, like a big fi rm, needs regular and data/fact-driven assessments of all aspects of the business, from human resources, productiv- ity, and managing, to fee arrangements, attorney and staff performance, and case results.


You helped found your fi rm in 2002. Why did you choose to start your own practice?


I wanted to build the premier minority-owned trial fi rm in the country. Starting with my generation, I saw a marked growth in the number of minorities admit-


ted to elite law schools and entering the legal profession, tracking the emerging diversifi cation of society in general. At the same time, trial was becoming a lost art and there was nobody—minority or otherwise—seeking to fi ll this critical void. I saw this as a remarkable opportunity for me and my fi rm.


What are the benefi ts of a small fi rm?


I can speak only to the benefi ts of my fi rm. Being a relatively small size, we have thorough quality control.


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