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What’s the Question? (from page 5) If only there were not so many pieces blocking the h-file ...


1. Qxh7+!! Attracting the king to h7. 1. ... Kxh7 2. Bg6+ Kg8


3. Bh7+!! Attracting the king to h7 again and getting rid of the bishop. 3. ... Kxh7 4. Nf5+ K-any 5. Nxe7#


Win or Draw (from page 6) Position One Solution: DRAWN!! 1. Rb7+ Kc8 2. Rb5 c1=Q


3. Rc5+ (a great attraction move!) 3. ... Qxc5 Stalemate! A study by E.B. Cook in Bilguer’s Handbuch, 1864 Position Two Solution:WHITE WINS!! 1. Rf8+ Rxf8 2. Qxh7+ (the attraction sacrifice) 2. ... Kxh7 3. gxf8=N+ Kg7 4. Nxd7 and wins—a piece up. From an 1887 off-hand game. Position Three Solution: DRAWN!! 1. Rcg1 Bxg1 (Not following the lure of attraction also leads to a draw: 1. ... Nf4 2. Rxg7 Bxg1 3. Kxg1 b5 4. Kf2 Kd5 5. Rh7 h5 6. Kf3 Nd3 7. Rxh5+ Kc4 8. Rxb5) 2. Rxg6+ Rxg6 Stalemate! A composition by Lucchese, from Lolli’s work in 1763 (Yes, it’s an old theme!) Position Four Solution:WHITE WINS!! This is one of my favorite problems, composed by David Przpiorka in 1920. When told that neither Tarrasch nor Lasker could solve it, irate British Chess Magazine (BCM) readers said that it was a joke as it was an obvious draw (see the note after move 2) 1. Re2 Qg8 (1. ... h6 2. Re8+ Kh7 3. Nf6+ Kg7 4. Rg8+) 2. Ng7 (an attraction for two pieces! This is where a lot of 1920s BCM readers thought it was a draw after 2. Nf6 Qg1 3. Re8+ Kg7 4. Rg8+ Kh6 5. Rxg1Stalemate) 2. ... Qxg7 (2. ... Kxg7 3. Rg2+ Kf8 4. Rxg8+ Kxg8 5. a5; 2. ... f5 3. Re8 Kxg7 [3. ... Qxe8 4. Nxe8 f4 5. Nd6 f3 6. Ne4] 4. Rxg8+ Kxg8 5. a5 f4 6. a6 f3 7. a7 f2 8. a8=Q+) 3. Re8+ Qg8 4. Rxg8+ Kxg8 5. a5 h5 6. a6 h4 7. a7 h3 8. a8=Q+ White wins all the pawn races! Position Five Solution: DRAWN!! 1. Kd8 Rd6+ 2. Ke7 Rc6 3. Kd7 Rh6 4. Bf6 (just the first attraction move!) 4. ... Bb1 (Black can’t take it if he wants to keep trying to win: 4. ... Rxf6 5. c8=Q Be6+ 6. Ke7 Bxc8 7. Kxf6) 5. Ke6 Rh5 6. Bg5 (6. c8=Q Bf5+) 6. ... Rh8 7. Bd8 Rh5 8. Bg5 (8. c8=Q Bf5+) and drawn by rep- etition! A composition by J.E. Peckover, 1958-59. Position Six Solution:WHITE WINS!! With a double attraction, no less!! 1. Ra2 Qxa2 2. Qb1 Qxb1 3. b7 g6 4. b8=Q+ Kg7 5. Qb7+ Kh6 6. Ne6 f5 7. Qg7+ Kh5 8. Qxh7# A composition by A.F. Mackenzie, 1885. Mackenzie lost his sight in 1896 and still went on to compose chess problems!


YOU CAN DO IT! (from page 11) Solution #1


Ove Weiss Hartvig (2300) - Carsten Juul Nielsen (2080) (B00) Copenhagen, 1996 1. e4 Nc6 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. d4 d6 4. Nf3 Bg4 5. Be3 a6 6. Be2 e6 7. h3 Bh5 8. d5 exd5 9. exd5 Bxf3 10. Bxf3 Ne5 11. Be2 Be7 12. g4 Nfd7 13. Qd2 Nb6 14. b3 Ng6 15. 0-0-0 Nh4 16. Rhg1 Qd7 17. Bg5 Bxg5 18. Qxg5 Ng6 19. Bd3 0-0 20. Qd2 Rfe8 21. f4 Qe7 22. f5 Ne5 23. Be4 Qh4 24. Rdf1 Nbd7 25. Rf4 Nc5 26. g5 Qh5 27. Qf2 Qxh3 28. Rg3 Nxe4 29. Nxe4 Qh1+ 30. Rg1 Qh5 31. Rg2 Qh1+ 32. Kb2 Nd7 33. Nf6+ gxf6 34. gxf6+ Kf8


8 7 6


5 4 3 2 1


r+-+rmk-+ +pzpn+p+p p+-zp-zP-+ +-+P+P+- -+-+-tR-+ +P+-+-+- PmKP+-wQR+ +-+-+-+q


a b c d e f g h


Solution #2 B. Moroff - Kindl (C02) 1976 1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. e5 c5 4. c3 Qb6 5. Bd3 cxd4 6. cxd4 Nc6 7. Nf3 Bd7 8. 0-0 Nxd4 9. Nxd4 Qxd4 10. Nc3 a6 11. Qe2 Ne7 12. Rd1 Qb6 13. Be3 d4 14. Bxd4 Qc7 15. Rac1 Nc6 16. Bb1 Be7 17. Qg4 Kf8 18. Ne4 h5 19. Qf4 Qd8 20. Bc5 Kg8 21. Rc3 Qe8 22. Rg3 Kf8 23. Nf6 gxf6


8 7 6


5 4 3 2 1


r+-+qmk-tr +p+lvlp+- p+n+pzp-+ +-vL-zP-+p -+-+-wQ-+ +-+-+-tR- PzP-+-zPPzP +L+R+-mK-


a b c d e f g h


-24. exf6 The pawn arrives on f6,


offering up the Bc5. 24. ... Bxc5 25. Rg8+! White’s queen has ac-


cess to g5 and h6, and the king’s escape is blocked. 25. ... Kxg8 25. ... Rxg8 26. Qh6+


is mate in one. 26. Qg5+ 1-0 ... with Qg7# on the


next move.


Solution #3 Hristina Ilieva (2145) - Liliana Ivanova (D30) Pernik, 1992 1. d4 d5 2. Nf3 e6 3. c4 c6 4. cxd5 exd5 5. Qc2 Bd6 6. Bg5 Ne7 7. e3 Qc7 8. Bd3 Bg4 9. Nc3 Nd7 10. Bxe7 Bxe7 11. Nxd5 Qa5+ 12. Nc3 Nb6 13. Ne5 Bh5 14. 0-0 Bd6 15. f4 Bg6 16. a3 Nd5 17. Nc4 Qd8 18. Nxd5 Bxd3 19. Qxd3 cxd5 20. Nxd6+ Qxd6 21. e4 0-0 22. e5 Qb6 23. f5 Rac8 24. f6 Rc6 25. Rf4 Rfc8 26. Raf1 R8c7 27. Rg4 Rc1 28. Rxg7+ Kf8


MOVE THE PIECES!


February 2013 Chess Life for Kids 19 Here, the Re8 blocks


the escape. 35. Rg8+ 1-0 35. ... Kxg8 36. Qg3+


with mate next move on g7.


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