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game with finesse. When GM Venkatesh was about to get mated, he resigned. Yes, the GM resigned! My first win over a GM! I was ecstatic


and a big smile broke out. It took me all of three years of playing chess to finally beat a GM. My last game of the year 2012 ended with a win over a GM. Those great, wily fishes always had got- ten away in the past. At best I’d draw. This time the hook was sunk. I had finally come out on top.


White: GM M. R. Venkatesh (2520) Black: Akshat Chandra (2294) Rose Valley Open International, Kolkata, India


December 13, 2012 My last game of 2012 and it is against


a GM. It was also the last round of this very strong open. 1. Nf3 Nf6 2. g3 g6 3. Bg2 Bg7 4. d3 d5 5. 0-0 0-0 6. Nbd2 The Reversed Kings Indian, I expected


him to do this and my intuition was correct. 6. … c5 7. e4 Nc6 8. Re1 e5 I knew it until here. Black usually gets


a Maroczy setup, and tries to put pres- sure on the d3-pawn. 9. c3 h6 This seemed logical enough since the


bishop is usually headed to e6. 10. exd5 If 10. Qb3 dxe4 11. dxe4 (Generally


these type of positions favor White due to the c4-square, and my dark-squared bishop. But here, he doesn’t have enough time to consolidate, and Black reaches a comfortable game after … Be6 and … a6. If White plays a4, then the b3- square would be weakened, and Black can make use of that by … Na5). 10. … Nxd5 11. Nc4 The right move. 11. Qb3 crossed my


mind during the game, but Black can simply play 11. … b6 12. Nxe5 Nxe5 13. Bxd5 Bf5. 11. … Re8 12. Nfd2 Played immediately, however this isn’t


the most common move. Theory sug- gests 12. a4 which anchors the c4- knight. But Black simply continues 12. … Bf5 with a comfortable game. 12. … Be6 13. Ne4 b6 13. … Qe7 is better. For some reason


this top choice of the computer didn’t cross my mind despite its simplicity. I wanted to defend c5 with a piece of


lesser value. Sometimes our mechanical friends can be wrong too. 14. a4 Bf8 For some reason I overreacted about


the d6-square. Some lines which I con- sidered during the game: 14. … Qc7: I rejected this because of


15. a5 Rad8 16. Qa4 (But, there is no real threat for Black here and I can simply continue with doubling on the d-file by means of … Re7). 14. … Qd7 15. a5 also didn’t look


good to me, but 15. … Rab8 16. Ned6 Red8 17. axb6 axb6 18. Qa4 Nde7 and Black is better. Perhaps I was under the impression that White must be having something, however Black can defend with a couple of precise moves, and then proceed to carry on with his own agenda. 15. a5 b5 A very risky plan. 15. … f5 16. Ned2


Bg7 17. axb6 axb6 18. Rxa8 Qxa8 19. Bxd5 Bxd5 20. Nxb6 and basically Black just loses a pawn for nothing, which is not to be recommended! 15. … Rb8 16. axb6 axb6 17. Ne3


Bg7 18. Nxd5 Bxd5 19. Be3 (19. c4 Bxe4 [19. … Be6 20. Nxc5 bxc5 21. Bxc6] 20. Bxe4 Nb4 21. Ra3 f5 22. Bg2 Re7 23. Bd2 Rd7 24. Bxb4 cxb4 25. Rb3 e4 26. Bf1 exd3 27. Bxd3 Kh7) 19. … Na5. As mentioned before, moving a4 weakens b3, and Black’s knight and bishop look to sink their teeth in it. 16. Ne3 The problem with the retreat of the


bishop from g7. The f6-square becomes a constant pain, and I need to watch out for forks. 16. … f5 17. Nxd5 Bxd5 18. Nf6+ Qxf6 19. Bxd5+ Kh7 So I have managed to trade down, but


White has the two bishops, and the bet- ter pawn structure. Also my f8-bishop isn’t seeing any light. However White has no way to really press his advantage. 20. Qf3 Rac8 21. a6 Now b5 can’t be protected by a6, and


also freeing the a1-rook. 21 … Red8 Inversing the move order with 21. …


Qd6 is more accurate. 22. Be3 22. Bxc6 Rxc6 23. Rxe5 Qxe5 24.


Qxc6 Qe1+ 25. Kg2 Rxd3 (While calcu- lating, I thought about this line and as- sumed it’s fine for me. However White wins with 26. Bxh6. I had seen this idea, but in a different line.) 26. Qb7+ Kg8


February 2013


(26. … Bg7 27. Bxh6) 27. Bxh6 Qxa1 28. Qb8 Kh7 29. Qxf8 Rd7 30. Bf4 Qxa6 31. Be5 Qc6+ 32. f3 g5 33. Qxf5+ Kg8 34. Qxg5+ Kf8 35. h4. 22. … Qd6 Now Black is back in the game.


23. Bb3 Black as a lot of pressure after 23. c4


Nb4. 23. … Qf6 24. Red1 24. Rad1 (Why not this rook?) 24. …


Rc7 (I can’t play 24. … c4 because of 25. dxc4 e4 26. Qe2 Ne5 27. Rxd8 Rxd8 28. cxb5 Nf3+ 29. Kf1 Nxe1 30. Kxe1). 24. … Rc7 25. h4 Rcd7 26. Bc2 Kh8 27. h5 Obviously he either missed or under-


estimated my 28th move. 27. … g5 27. … gxh5 28. Qxh5 f4 29. Bc1 Rg7


30. Kg2 is what the computer recom- mends, but I disagree. 28. g4 e4 29. Qe2 Loses immediately. But it is his best


shot since 29. dxe4 f4 30. Rxd7 Rxd7 31. Bc1 Ne5 32. Qe2 c4 33. f3 Bc5+ 34. Kg2 Qb6 and now White is con- demned to passivity. 29. … f4 30. Bc1 exd3 31. Rxd3 Re7 32. Qd1 Rde8 In time pressure I make a hasty reflex


move. (32. … Rxd3 33. Qxd3 [Just as good for Black is 33. Bxd3 Qd6 34. Qf1 Ne5] 33. … Re1+ 34. Kh2 [Even worse for White is 34. Kg2 f3+ 35. Qxf3 Rg1+] 34. … Qf7 35. Qf5 Qxf5 36. Bxf5 c4). 33. Bd2 Ne5 33. … Qe6 still retains a major portion


of the advantage according to the en- gines but it’s not such an obvious move when one is short on time. 34. Rh3 Ne5 35. Bf5 Qc6 36. c4 Nxc4 37. Bc3+ Bg7 38. Bg6 Rf8 39. Rd3 Bxc3 40. Rxc3 Ne5 (Not as good is 40. … Nxb2) 41. Bf5 Rxf5 (41. … b4 42. Rh3 Rxf5 [42. … Kg7 43. b3 Rxf5 44. gxf5 Qf6] 43. gxf5 g4 [Almost as good is 43. … Qf6] 44. Rd3 Nxd3 45. Qxd3 g3 46. Rd1 gxf2+ 47. Kxf2 Qf6 48. Kf1). Decisive is 33. … Re2 34. Be3 (The


move 34. Re3 works but not as strong). 34. Rd5 Qe6 35. c4 Nxc4 36. Bc3+ Bg7 37. Bf5 Qe2 37. … Qg8 38. Qd3 Bxc3 39. Qxc3+ Qg7 40. Rxc5 Nxb2 41. Qxg7+ Kxg7


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