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PEBBLE BEACH RESORTS


A Silver Lining A


s one of the preeminent links layouts in the United States, The Links at


Spanish Bay has been widely rec- ognized for its pristine adaptation of old-world golf on the California coastline. Known for its rolling land- scape and ocean views, today’s course sits on a former mining operation that produced highly valued sand rich in silica content throughout the first half of the 20th century. Regulations ultimately forced the operation’s closure in the early 1970s, but new plans for the area weren’t too far behind. On November 7, 1987, The


Links at Spanish Bay welcomed its first golfers to seaside fairways, newly-formed walking paths and preserved dune habitats. The designers themselves—Tom Watson, Roberts Trent Jones Jr. and Frank “Sandy” Tatum—teed it up on that opening day with Watson, the 1982 U.S. Open champion at Pebble Beach Golf Links, firing a 5-under 67, a course record that still stands today. The legendary trio of design- ers used the natural landscape of the low-lying area to test golfers, offering a unique “risk and reward” conundrum among the inherent hazards. “The golf course requires both confidence and skill to navigate the willows, marsh, bunkers and


22 / NCGA.ORG / FALL 2012


Spanish Bay Celebrates 25 Years at Pebble Beach Resorts


With wide-open coastal vistas and hole names like “To the Sea,” “Shepherd’s Haven” and “Dune Hollow,” it’s easy to think of The Links at Spanish Bay as a century-old layout along the Scottish Isles, rich with the history of its European cousins. From the undulating fairways and greens to the natural design that seamlessly fits the coastline, it seems like this famed course at Pebble Beach Resorts has been nestled in Del Monte Forest forever. In 2012, The Links—along with its neighboring luxury hotel, The Inn at Spanish Bay—celebrates its 25th anniversary, forging yet another historical milestone for this timeless course.


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