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Face Off T e batfish, the moth, and the bleeding heart all have a kind of symmetry called bilateral symmetry. It’s also called mirror symmetry. T at’s because it’s a little like looking in a mirror and seeing your ref lection. In nature, though, both sides aren’t always


exactly the same. You can see that if you draw a line of symmetry down the middle of your face. You might notice that one eyebrow is


slightly higher than the other. Or maybe when you smile, you’ve got only one dimple instead of two. Both sides of your face are almost alike, though. So it’s still symmetry.


These bleeding heart fl owers look like hearts. You can divide each bloom into two matching halves.


Divide each bleeding heart fl ower in half. Both sides match.


Both sides of this luna moth look almost alike. The moth is an example of symmetry.


NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2012 5


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