This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Alfred Felder Appointed as New Tridonic CEO


Schönbrunn Palace Illuminated with Help From Robe


Around 135 Robe moving lights and LED fixtures were specified for the illumination of the 2012 Summer Night Concert, which was staged by the Philharmonic orchestra at Schönbrunn Palace, a UNESCO World Heritage site in the Austrian city of Vienna.


From the 1st November, Alfred Felder will take over the position of Chief Executive Officer of Tridonic. Felder succeeds Walter Zeigler, who left the company in January. Felder has a strong knowledge of the field of optosemiconductors, and has decades of management experience in the electronics industry. He has previously worked in Japan, the USA and China. Since 2003, Felder has filled various management roles in the areas of OLED and LED technology with Osram, where he was lastly responsible for Osram’s worldwide general lighting sales activities. “We are delighted that, in Alfred Felder, we have been able to recruit a highly experienced technology expert and far-sighted manager to head up our Components business,” said Zumtobel Group CEO Harald Sommerer. “With his extensive knowledge of LED and OLED technology, his familiarity with the industry and his leadership skills, he will be able to play a major part in ensuring that Tridonic is fit for the future in this dynamic phase of the technology shift. I am convinced that in Alfred Felder, the new COO Gavin Brydon and CFO Werner Blum, we have an outstanding management team with whom to set Tridonic back on course for sustained profitable growth.”


Robe fixtures were used in four key areas at the event, which was attended by over 100,000 people. Lighting Designer Helmut Krammer specified the fixtures after a positive experience working with them at the 2011 event.


“Robe provided absolutely the right products for the


project, and I found it wonderful to work with fixtures that gave me the freedom and flexibility to achieve the precise creative look and feel I wanted in the Gardens,” explains Krammer.


For even more


news stories please visit the A1 Lighting website


www.a1lightingmagazine.com


Zumtobel Involved in London Art Installation


Luminaire expert Zumtobel often gets involved in projects of art and culture, helping renowned artists to realise their visions of lighting systems. In collaborating with internationally renowned Italian artist Monica Bonvicini, Zumtobel has helped to create a unique lighting installation to be admired by visitors to London this summer.


Zumtobel and Bonvicini developed a huge permanent lighting sculpture, entitled “RUN”, which stands pride of place in front of the Handball Arena at the London Olympic Park. “RUN” is a collection of three nine metre tall letters, each positioned slightly behind the other, which are made from mirror-coated glass panels mounted on steel structures. During the day the sculpture reflects it’s surroundings, making it almost invisible. In the evening, the sculpture comes to life thanks to LED luminaires installed inside the sculptures along the lines of each letter, creating what Bonvicini describes as an “elegantly psychedelic effect at night”. Zumtobel collaborated closely with the artist to make sure that her vision for the installation was turned into a


reality. Completion of the sculpture was achieved thanks to the years of experience that Zumtobel has obtained in the field of LED technology and as a result of previous involvement in a number of artistic installations.


www.a1lightingmagazine.com 11


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68