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on the Potomac Eagle excursion that runs out of Romney, W.Va. Joining them was CSX 116, which was donated to the C&O Historical Society and sub- sequently leased by Eagle Cañon. The units last ran in 1997 and the lease was terminated in 1998, and the 117 and 118 (which had been renumbered to 417 and 418 in 1996) were routed to Huntington Shop for storage. The 117 and 118 were officially retired in 2000


and sold to the West Virginia Central where they became “Western Mary- land” 415 and 67. They continue to op- erate for the Durbin & Greenbrier Val- ley (see July 2012 RAILFAN & RAILROAD). The former 116 was re- painted as “C&O” 8016 and sees occa- sional service on the Potomac Eagle and the South Branch Valley Railroad. The CSX 119 eventually went to the Tennessee Valley Railroad Museum for


future preservation. In preparing this article, I wanted to


share photos from all five states that the RoadRailer traveled through. The land changes from the wide-open corn- fields in Ohio to red earth kudzu moun- tains of Tennessee and Georgia. Nearly a decade after covered wagons had all but disappeared from main line freight, CSX offered one last curtain call. It was an amazing sight to see, and made an already interesting decade of railroad- ing just a little bit more memorable for this railfan.


Special thanks to the late Roger Rass-


che for his assistance on locomotive in- formation, and also to Scott Lindsay for his help in gaining valuable informa- tion for this article.


OPPOSITE: Heading south out of Hickory Creek Tunnel No. 1 on the former Louisville & Nashville, RoadRailer train R-211 rolls through Morley, Tenn., on August 28, 1988. DAVID P. OROSZI


LEFT: CSX F7 No. 118 is near the north end of its run at Livonia, Mich., on April 16, 1988. KEN BORG


BELOW: Meanwhile, near the south end, the train passes through Cartersville, Ga., on No- vember 2, 1988. STEVE GLISCHINSKI


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