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Food For The Poor developed a concept for a fishing village program in 2001 in Jamaica, gradually expanding it to Haiti. The concept was simple — give fishermen modern equipment to fish farther out in the sea so they can haul in bigger and better catches. Through generous donors who fund the fishing villages, the results have proven to be miraculous to desperate fathers like Marcus.


Not only did the village receive new fiberglass boats


and motors, but donations also funded the construction of a concrete building, a new freezer to store their catches, and built several new homes in the area.


Marcus became a boat captain. Today he and his


crew fish the azure waters off Jamaica’s coast. The income they earn from their hard labor not only benefits the men and their families, but the village as well. The fishermen give part of their catch to local schools so all the children can eat. They’ve also helped with repairs, and improved the sanitation for the schools.


Marcus’s life has changed dramatically. He sends his children to school each day and takes pride in their


academic achievements. Gone are the days when he’d humbly beg for a seat on a fishing boat. Now he gives fish to an elderly blind woman who has no one to take care of her.


“I feel good about myself,” he said. But most of all,Marcus is grateful for God’s


blessings in his life. The village is “a blessing from Almighty God” and a “blessing unto Jamaica.”No longer does he weep because his children are suffering. Instead, there is praise to the Almighty, and thanks to our loving donors, the opportunity to work hard and help others. f


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