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Production • Processing • Handling


Stainless steel for onshore and offshore projects B


utting is one of the leading processors of stainless steel. Its services include: corrosion resistant pipes;


clad pipes; special pipes and machined pipes; components and pipes ready for installation; vessels, tanks and columns; fittings. Core competences are in forming and welding


techniques and in materials engineering. Butting supplies special pipes to the oil and gas


industry, ie for onshore and offshore as well as subsea projects with expertise in welding, forming and materials technology. The company produces flowlines, riser pipes and others for topsides (platform FPSO) as well as line pipes. For clad pipes Butting is the only mill in Europe using


two different processes: metallurgically clad pipes and mechanically bonded pipes (BuBi-pipe).


Ever since the mid-


eighties Butting has been producing metallurgically clad pipes for companies all over the world, especially for use in the oil and gas industry. As regards the size


range, it produce ODs from 114.3 mm (4-in) up to 1 219 mm (48- in) in various material combinations. The company says


pipes can be supplied with either an external or internal cladding.


The BuBi-pipe consists of a corrosion-resisting


Butting pipe which is telescopically aligned inside a pipe in carbon-manganese material. The tight bonding between the two pipes is achieved by hydraulic expansion. The producible size range comprises pipes in ODs


from 114.3 mm (4-in) up to 660 mm (26-in) and lengths up to 12m without circumferential weld. Compared with the metallurgically clad pipe, its


BuBi-pipe offers a wide range of material combinations for both the inner and outer pipes. Butting’s quality management system is certified


according to DIN EN ISO 9001 by Germanischer Lloyd, and there are also many other authorisations. ●


Enter 65 or ✔ at www.engineerlive.com/iog BUTTING GmbH & Co KG is based in


Knesebeck, Germny. www.butting.de


Reducing contamination in the bearing environment A


s end-users of rotating equipment seek to extend the life of these applications, increasing emphasis


is being placed on reducing contamination in the bearing environment. Bearing Isolator technology, originally developed by


Inpro/Seal in 1977, has been an integral part of increasing the mean time between repair (MTBR) and improving the reliability of a variety of rotating equipment. The Inpro/Seal Bearing Isolator is a two part dynamic


seal consisting of a stator, most commonly press-fitted into the bearing housing, and a rotor attached to the shaft. The rotor and stator join together to form a non- contacting compound labyrinth seal with no wearing parts. It protects in two ways: bearing lubricant is captured in the inner portion of the labyrinth and flows back to the bearing housing; outside contamination


attempting to enter the bearing housing is captured in the outer labyrinth paths and expelled through a port in the rotor by centrifugal force and gravity. The Bearing Isolator was invented to replace lip seals as a sealing solution in industrial process equipment, such as pumps, motors, gearboxes, pillow blocks and other types of rotating equipment. Because of their contacting design, friction against the shaft limits the life span of lip seals to approximately 3000 hours. Alternatively, an Inpro/Seal Bearing Isolator lacks any


wearing parts thereby sealing the bearing for the life of the equipment. ●


Enter 65A or ✔ at www.engineerlive.com/iog


Inpro/Seal is based in Rock Island, IL, USA and Glasgow, UK. www.inpro-seal.com


www.engineerlive.com 65


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