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ARTICLE | DERMAL REJUVENATION |


CARBOXYTHERAPY CARBON DIOXIDE INJECTIONS IN AESTHETIC MEDICINE


Carboxytherapy is not a new treatment modality,


but has often been under-used in aesthetic medicine. In this article Sabine Zenker provides and overview of treatment protocol for a range of conditions


ABSTRACT Carbon dioxide therapy is an area of aesthetic practice that has been relatively under-researched, yet widely used. However, those studies that have examined this technique have demonstrated that it improves skin elasticity, circulation and the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles, aids collagen repair, and destroys localised fatty deposits. It is a simple and cost-effective technique. This article reviews the literature available with regard to carboxytherapy and outlines the techniques of treatment.


SABINE ZENKER is Dermatologist, Dermatology Surgery Clinic, Munich, Germany


email: Kontakt@dr-zenker.de


during the 1930s, it was found that bathing in pools of carbon dioxide-rich water helped to speed up wound healing. By the 1950s, the technique was used by cardiologists to treat patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease, as well as other conditions caused by poor blood circulation and fat accumulation in the arteries. Since 1995, when the term ‘carboxytherapy’ was coined, it has increased in popularity in the field of aesthetics, and particularly for lipolysis1, 2


C


KEYWORDS carbon dioxide injections, collagen, lipolysis, dermal regeneration


42 ❚ and


dermal rejuvenation treatments. studies


. Indeed, have


ARBON DIOXIDE


THERAPY (CDT), or carboxytherapy, is not a new technique within medical


practice. Developed in France


technique for aesthetic purposes uses intradermal or subcutaneous injections using a medical grade 30 G or 32 G needle to inject sterile carbon dioxide gas, which is delivered using standard programmable apparatus, for the treatment of aged skin, dark undereye circles, localised fat pads, and stretchmarks, for example.


The use of carbon


dioxide in medicine is not a novel technique, but has been used in medical therapeutics for centuries.


demonstrated that CDT improves skin elasticity, circulation and the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles, aids collagen repair, and destroys localised fatty deposits. Essentially, carboxytherapy is the


transcutaneous administration of carbon dioxide for therapeutic purposes. The


January/February 2012 | prime-journal.com


Carbon dioxide: mode of action Carbon dioxide is an odourless and colourless gas, which, when injected subcutaneously, diffuses at the cutaneous microcirculatory level. As a result, the body will attempt to correct what it considers an imbalance of oxygen/ carbon dioxide levels,


increasing


blood flow to supply oxygen and nutrients to the skin and vessels.


This


ultimately improves the appearance of the skin. As detailed, however, the use of carbon dioxide in medicine is not a novel technique, but has been used in medical therapeutics for centuries. Reports suggest that in the 17th


and 18th centuries it was used to treat chronic skin ulcers


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