This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
To bring this super-efficient design up to Passive House standards, the U.S. team imported certain products from Germany.
Framed with steel and built with 11” ICF walls, plus an 11” EIFS system, this home meets or exceeds Geman Passivhaus standards.


The plan keeps windows to a minimum on every face except the southwest (shown on p. 41) but where glass is present, it’s triple glazed and gas-filled, offering three times the R-value of a typical dual-paned low-E window.


 


PROJECT TEAM
Builder
Morrissey Builders
Arden Hills, MN


Architect
Tim Delhey Eian
T.E. Design
Minneapolis, MN


Interiors
Christine Frisk
InUnison Design
Minneapolis, MN


Dubbed “Passive House in the Woods,” this project takes energy efficiency far beyond the experience of most residential builders. It’s a bleeding edge design, a strikingly modern structure that produces 65% more electricity than it needs. It also has an interesting back story.


“The client’s wife was ill with cancer as we were planning this home,” notes architect Tim Delhey Eian.


“She passed away before construction began, and we ended up changing the design to a much more vertical plan.


“We chose ICFs deliberately, as a pretty fail-safe construction method,” he adds. “I had a good grasp of Passivhaus concepts, because I grew up in Germany and completed the training there.”


Deep Science
Although the systems in this home are familiar, this project takes them to a higher level. The ICFs, for example, extend below grade, and are augmented with a commercial-grade EIFS system that includes 11” of EPS foam above grade—making a wall 22” thick with an R-value of 70.


“We tried to get the North American branch (of Sto Corp.) to provide the details we wanted, but the deal fell through,” the architect notes. “They only offered this version of EIFS in Europe. It puts all of the water management on the exterior. They’ve now started offering it in the U.S.”


The flat roof includes 14” of polyisocyanurate foam, achieving R-95, and the windows and doors, imported from Germany, are triple-pane, low-E coated, with insulated frames. They have an installed R-value of 8. By comparison, a typical wood or vinyl-framed, dual-pane, low-E window achieves only about R-2.

Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76
Produced with Yudu - www.yudu.com