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This urban timber frame home elevates the art of craft in home building.
PROJECT TEAM
Builder
NewEnergyWorks Timberframers
McMinnville, OR


Architect
Jonathan Orpin and Ty Allen
New Energy Works Design Department
McMinnville, OR


Landscape Architect
Landscape East and West
Clackamas, OR


Interiors
Maxine
Bloomfield McMinnville, OR


The timber in this home is FSC-certified reclaimed wood.


The spare, 2,000-sq.- ft. footprint proves that a family can live comfortably in smaller spaces if they are well- organized. The home features an open kitchen and family room and a play room in the day-lit lower level.


 


The builders of this timber frame house took craft to a new level with their extensive use of salvaged and natural materials and reclaimed wood, impressing the judges with its thoughtful detailing and warm interiors.


The house is the first LEED Platinum timber frame home candidate in Oregon, points out Jonathan Orpin, the co-designer and builder. “For me, the main issue of sustainable building is that there isn’t only one issue. Projects must balance four major points: advanced thermal and mechanical systems, thoughtful and sustainable sourcing of materials, longevity and effectiveness in structure and enclosure systems, and high levels of design and craft.”


Orpin calls timber frame a “smart way to build.” An expression of structure and craft, a home built using this structural system will last many generations. This home’s high-efficiency envelope of structural insulated panels and Matrix walls eliminates thermal breaks. The timbers are FSC re-claimed wood. Prebuilt frame and enclosures meant reduced construction time.


A high percentage of the materials for the house were sourced locally with low embodied energy and recycled content. “Every effort was made to use products sourced and manufactured in the United States, which is not always an easy task— but worth every moment,” Orpin says.


Built on a vacant flag parcel in southwest Portland, the 2,000-sq.-ft. home is a good example of urban infill. It is situated to take advantage of both passive and active solar efficiencies. Strategically placed energy-efficient windows and doors combine with large overhangs to reduce solar heat gain and wind exposure. In colder months, a 96%-98% efficient boiler warms wall-hung radiators and radiant floor systems. Windows and ceiling fans cool the home without the need for air-conditioning in warmer months.

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