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150-mph winds. An aluminum frame was built around the existing structure, secured to the ground and covered with a steel roof. Its exterior is stucco, though other materials, such as brick, could be used as well for the outside of the home. “When it comes to upgrading


existing properties, Cat Five Houses of Charleston offers a wide array of solutions ranging from a simple exter- nal framework bolted into an existing timber structure, which has minimal intrusion, to a total rework, complete with internal support beams,” Ray Hawes commented. He and his wife recently moved


An aluminum frame


was built around the existing structure, secured to the


ground and covered with a steel roof.


into Mount Pleasant’s other hurricane-proof house, a modern, two-story structure with a huge storage area and garage beneath that overlooks Charleston National Golf Club. Other than the thickness of the walls, which are insulated between the interior of the house and the alumi- num framing, it’s impossible to distin- guish the home from one that might be blown away by one of the many hurricanes that threaten the serenity of the coast every year between June 1 and Nov. 30.


Both homes are a testament to


Hawes’ theory that he can help design houses that are pleasing to the eye and at the same time wind-proof. He said Cat Five Houses of Charleston can work with an architect and builder to produce a house of any shape or design. “We’re not going to be defeated


by shape,” he said, pointing out that his company won’t be competing with builders but will be enhancing their work by producing the foundation and framework for hurricane-proof homes. Cat Five’s homes will have


other advantages besides being able to withstand hurricane-force winds. For example, Hawes expects the utility bills on his own home to be cut in half, and termites, a perennial problem in the


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