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Part Three: Horizon Adult Remand Centre


the low population at HARC are unclear, it may be that the institution is understaffed, or that the poor construction of the building means it cannot hold its full quota. Or it may be that the need to transport remandees to courts around the island and a lack of transport vehicles make it impractical to incarcerate more remandees at HARC. A further possibility is that the relatively low rate of pre-trial detention in Jamaica simply dictates that the institution is not filled to capacity.


Whatever the reason, one is struck immediately upon entering HARC by the number of empty cells (at the time of the visit only around half the cells were in use) and amount of space available, especially in comparison with the reported conditions in lockups around the island,47


Corrections Act has already been utilised to specify that certain sections of HARC are to be used as an adult correctional centre (as opposed to a remand centre),48


and the acutely overcrowded SCACC and TSACC. Given that the and that the


institution now houses a good number of sentenced inmates, it is surprising that the free cell space has not been used to house greater numbers of both sentenced and remanded men, thus alleviating the overcrowding elsewhere in the island’s penal system.49


47 48 49


See the report of the United Nations Special Rapporteur, n.32 above, pp.10-11 and appendix. See the Corrections (Horizon Adult Correctional Centre)(Declaration) Order 2005, made under s.6(1) of the Corrections Act 1985.


See further the report of the United Nations Special Rapporteur, n.32 above, pp.11-12 and appendix. Te report raises concerns about the conditions of detention at HARC in general. It also documents a serious disturbance at the centre on 8th February 2010, as a result of which 60 detainees were injured and 35 were taken to hospital. Te report concludes that the medical evidence regarding the injuries to detainees strongly corroborated detainees’ allegations that they had been subject to ill-treatment (including the use of ‘blunt force with a series of blows to the body’) at the hands of correctional officers, and that ‘severe pain was intentionally inflicted for the purpose of punishment, amounting to torture’ (p.12).


51


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