This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Part Two: St Catherine Adult Correctional Centre and Tower Street Adult Correctional Centre


progressive and positive elements of the maximum security end of the Jamaican penal system, whilst recognising that in the pervading conditions, the successful rehabilitation of any more than a tiny proportion of inmates remains extremely difficult.


Education


A high proportion of Jamaican prisoners are illiterate, and both TSACC and SCACC provide educational classes from basic literacy to the CSEC examinations in English and Mathematics (the Caribbean equivalent of GCSEs). 150 inmates per term are permitted to participate in educational classes at SCACC, and up to 320 at TSACC, on a part time basis. Both institutions possess very small and limited libraries which lack new books.


At both institutions a number of inmates are able to take part in musical activities, with a range of instruments including electric guitars and drum kits available. TSACC possesses a small but professional standard recording studio, which was funded by the Canadian High Commission. TSACC also has a computer lab with internet facilities, and its own internet based radio station. However, the numbers of inmates able to utilise these progressive and positive facilities are very limited. Only around 25 inmates were permitted to use the internet facilities at TSACC, partly due to illiteracy and inability to use the computer systems amongst the general population. As with the rehabilitative programmes at the prisons in general, the schemes were very positive in outlook, but were swimming helplessly against a tide of overcrowding and lack of resources.


Vocational Schemes


Tere are a limited number of rehabilitative schemes in operation at SCACC and TSACC. What schemes do exist seemed, from what could be gleaned from such short visits, to be very positive. At SCACC 20 inmates work in a tailor shop, largely making and repairing uniforms for the institution staff, and 10 inmates are employed in the workshop. At TSACC these figures are 41 and 16 respectively. Te workshop at SCACC was particularly impressive, with a high standard of metal and woodwork being practised. At the time of the visit, furniture and ornaments were being constructed, some to be sold outside the prison to raise funds for correctional services. In addition, around 20 inmates staff the onsite kitchens at both prisons preparing the meals for the entire populations, and SCACC boasts a bakery which prepares the bread for most of the penal facilities on the island.


Many inmates bring professional skills with them when imprisoned, and vocational experience is apparently an aid to being assigned to one of the schemes. A lucky few learn the skills inside. With being assigned to one of the activities comes certain privileges,


39


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68
Produced with Yudu - www.yudu.com