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Delivering world-class hospitals


Lessons from the four corners of the world By Conor Ellis, Partner & Global Account Leader, EC Harris, Manchester, UK


‘Competition to achieve a place in the top 500 major hospitals worldwide is fierce


I


t is estimated that the countries in the GCC will need to increase their current spend on new and existing hospitals by around


US$60 billion, or four times what is currently spent (according to Dr Kotilianel, GCC Economic Research). One of the many challenges that this vast spend presents is to ensure that new and existing hospitals are delivered and managed to the best possible standards and are amongst the best in the world.


Whilst it is difficult to quantify exactly the


number of major hospitals around the world, estimates suggest that North America houses close to 9,000. China has more than 20,000 and there are many thousands in other parts of Asia, Europe and over 500 in the GCC. Clearly competition to achieve a place in the top 500 major hospitals worldwide is fierce. For organisations in the GCC that aspire to be major branded health organisations, often with health tourist destinations and peer regard, this means bringing best practice in design, operation, clinical outcomes and value together as a complete package.


If the GCC is to deliver the very besting


healthcare outcomes for its patients, then there are four key stages of excellence that must be considered when designing new-build facilities or seeking to deliver sustainable, quality services from existing facilities. These are:  Demand management/forecasting  Planning and strategy  Organisational governance and patient experience  Asset efficiency Too often the concentration is on


simply one part of the journey rather than continuous project improvement. This article concentrates on best practice from our global project portfolio, from major private and public hospitals in countries such as in Canada, Sweden, Australia, France, Abu Dhabi and the UK.


DEMAnD MAnAGEMEnt AnD forECAstinG Too often scant effort is put into real forecasting of activity. With people living longer across the world, technological and


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