This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
GENETICS IN MEXICO


On the basis of scientific breakthroughs in the past 30 years in the field of biotechnology, the number of patents has significantly increased, particularly in relation to genetic materials. Fernando Rincón looks at the Mexican situation.


Genetic material in the form of gene or partial DNA or RNA sequences plays an important role in medical research, for example, for the development of new drugs, tests and in diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of diseases as well as in agricultural and industrial fields.


In this regard, Article 16, Section II of the Industrial Property Law states:


“Inventions that inventive


are new, the result of an step and susceptible of industrial


application within the meaning of this Law shall be patentable, with the exception of:


[…] II. biological and genetic material as found in nature.”


Moreover, Article 19, Section II of the Industrial Property Law states:


“Te following shall not be considered inventions for the purposes of this Law:


[…] II. discoveries that consist in making known or revealing something that already existed in nature, even though it was previously unknown to man.”


www.worldipreview.com


Te prohibitions are similar to the patentability criteria dictated by the European Patent Office (EPO) and the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO)—genetic material that is a mere discovery of nature is not patentable.


Nevertheless, the Mexican Institute of Industrial Property (MIIP), as well as the EPO and USPTO, allow the protection of genetic material taken from humans, animals, plants, bacteria, viruses, yeast, etc., provided that it has been isolated or purified from its natural environment or synthesised, and it has been definitively characterised by a technical process. Te technical application of the genetic material must also be described along with the specification of the application.


In this regard, genetic material that can be protected in Mexico is, for example, in the form of DNA copies known as complementary DNA (cDNA). Tis matter is regarded as patentable because the non-coding segments


found in


chromosomal DNA and the coding segment splicing are done at the RNA level in the natural environment, and consequently cDNA might not correspond to something found in nature.


Life Sciences Intellectual Property Review 2011 23


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84