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DAVE


We all squeezed in our truck and we headed towards the dock. We made a quick pit stop at the post office so Ingo could mail something and he introduced us to Tony, the postmaster. Awesome! Tony was willing to be photographed later in the week. It was obvious Ingo was not used to being in a vehicle. He was a combination of a back seat driver and a tiny bit of a nervous Nellie, but we thought perhaps it had a lot to do with Robyn’s driving. We headed towards the dock and ventured down a road we had never been on. After a relatively quick drive, we parked by the side of the road and hiked up a long, steep path marked with seashells to guide the way - sort of like Hansel and Gretel. As we were walking up the path, we began to see a strange looking structure. It was something called a cob house, but it looked


more like a gingerbread house to us. A cob house is a structure made of clay, sand, straw and manure using a building process that is painfully slow. Part of the cobbing life is holding workshops to teach others how to build their own homes. Applicants pay a fee and learn all about how to built a cob house. Food and accommodations are provided. In return, the host of the workshop gets labourers to build their place. Of course, we jumped right in, starting by going to the top of the hill where we mixed the clay and sand in a wheelbarrow. Taking the mixture and bringing it back down to the work area where there were tarps lying on the ground. After adding the mixture, we then took our shoes off and crushed the lumps with our feet. Next we watered down the dirt and added straw, lifting each side of the tarp, one at a time,


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