This book includes a plain text version that is designed for high accessibility. To use this version please follow this link.
sible to do PBL in almost any school environment, it is most feasible and most effective when certain conditions are in place school-wide. Looking at school models where all teachers are successfully creating main course PBL (e.g., Envision Schools, New Technology High Schools, Expeditionary Learning Schools, High Tech High and Middle Schools, EdVisions Schools, etc.), we find they have the following features in common:

• Common values, definitions, and assumptions about what constitutes good instruction. Main course Project-Based Learning is considered the norm by teachers and students.

• Project libraries containing a range of projects to use or adapt. Since these lie at the heart of main course Project-Based Learning, they are vetted for quality, road-tested in class- rooms, and made easily accessible online with complete resources and instructions.

• Professional development and coaching from experienced Project-Based Learning teachers. This includes materials and workshops on designing projects, site visits to model schools where main course PBL is thriving, and sustained support over time from peers and instructional coaches.

• Supportive school policies and practices that improve PBL quality and ease of use. In addition to and as an effective form of professional development, schools with main course Project-Based Learning provide plenty of time for teachers to meet with col- leagues to plan projects, critique and fine-tune lessons, and gather and share re- sources. Common, calibrated rubrics for 21st century learning goals are used by the whole school, and grading policies and practices are standardized to account for the use of PBL. The facilities, materials, and technology for projects are readily available, and shared project calendars make it possible to schedule project components in different classes without conflict. Daily and weekly schedules are adjusted to provide longer and more flexible blocks of class time for PBL.

• Administrative and instructional leadership that puts a priority on providing the time and other resources necessary to make PBL happen. These leaders promote main course PBL to parents, the community, and the students to be sure everyone is on board with the effort and to help troubleshoot implementation issues when they occur.

Moving to Scale

The model schools and classrooms described above provide proof points for main course Project-Based Learning and the 21st century preparation it provides. The features listed above describe what needs to be done at the school level for consistently implemented,

Virginia Educational Leadership Vol. 7 No. 1 Spring 2010 32 Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73
Produced with Yudu - www.yudu.com