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opportunity to master their behavior and their learning. The more success that a student experiences, the more engaged he or she will be in the learning. The more engaged the stu- dent is in the learning process, the less opportunity for misbehavior.

At the very basic level, students need to have their physiological needs met. If a student is hungry, tired, or fearful, he or she is unable to stay focused in the classroom. The teacher has a dramatic and immediate impact in the area of safety, both physical and emotional. Physical safety is possible through the establishment of clearly explained and modeled rules and pro- cedures. Emotional safety is established though positive interactions with classmates and the teacher. Part of this emotional security is also connected to the student’s feeling of belonging. It is the teacher’s responsibility to establish a safe and nurturing environment for students. The use of cooperative groups and class meetings assist establishing congeniality and the feeling of community. Consistency and fairness are the cornerstones to this development.

How boring and dull life would be if there were no fun or humor. The classroom is no differ- ent. If learning is fun and enjoyable for students, they in turn will be more engaged in the learning process.

As children grow older and mature, freedom becomes more important to them. The stu- dent’s need for freedom can be used to promote learning by offering classroom choices. Offering choices in academics and behavior helps students accept the responsibility for their actions yet hold them accountable for their learning.

Power is gained in the classroom by practicing effective communication skills. How the teacher communicates with parents and students plays a significant role in how well the classroom is managed. Because students gain power from their own success, they can be helped to achieve mastery through the development of positive classroom climate and in- struction promoting that success.

References

Canter, L. (1989, September). Assertive discipline: More than names on the board and marbles in a jar. Phi Delta Kappan. 71, 57-81.

Canter, L. (1992). Assertive discipline: positive behavior management for today’s classroom. Santa Monica: Lee Canter & Associates. Retrieved from

http://campus.dyc.edu/~drwaltz/FoundLearnTheory/FLT_readings/Canter.htm

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