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NEWS


societies as independent third party organisations respecting law and order reinforced.” As a result of and during the course of the


investigation IACS agreed to develop qualitative membership criteria and the institution of an independent appeal board. Additionally IACS will offer non-IACS societies the opportunity to participate in its technical work.


Shipbuilding HHI delivers new


product tanker Te 112,000dwt tanker NS Africa, the vessel is the fourth in a series of four similar aframax ships, was delivered to owners Novoship, part of the Sovcomflot Group, last month. Te NS Africa was built with fully coated cargo


tanks that will allow it to carry up to four different grades of cargo simultaneously including clean petroleum products. Specifications: • Length on Average 250.0 m • Breadth Moulded 44.0 m • Depth 21 m • Draft 14.7 m • Service Speed (open water) 15.0knots • Main Engine Maximum Continuous Rating 19 430 bhp (14 280 kW) at 105rpm


Te first two ice-class vessels NS Arctic and NS


Antarctic were delivered in the second quarter 2009 while NS Asia was delivered on 21 July. Te design and the operational characteristics


of the vessels are in compliance with the ultimate requirements of Oil Majors as well as the requirements set by international and national conventions related to the safety of navigation and the protection of marine environment. DNV has issued the Clean Notation for the NS Africa.


Finance FLEX LNG IPO on


Oslo bourse Flex LNG held late in October an initial public offering in a bid to raise US$10million in working capital for the company. The company issued 102,364,371 shares with a


nominal value of US$0.01 with the initial price range set to between NOK4.5 to NOK8 per share. Shares will trade on the Oslo Axess exchange. Trading in the shares was expected to start on or around the 30 October.


12 The Naval Architect November 2009


Acquisitions


Hamworthy acquires Krystallon


Krystallon Limited, the company which supplies on board sulphur emissions scrubbers, has been bought by Hamworthy, forming a new company, Hamworthy Krystallon. Krystallon was a leader in the in the gas scrubber


field and it was trials of its plant and material that was material to the International Maritime Organization’s (IMO) decision to approve gas scrubbers as an alternative to low sulphur fuel, as required MARPOL Annex VI regulations on emissions. Te renamed Hamworthy Krystallon will be part of


the Inert Gas Systems division. Last year IMO agreed the concept of Emission


Control Areas, ruling that the maximum sulphur content in fuels used in such zones must be cut to 1.5%, then to 1% by 2012, and to 0.1% in 2015. Te regulations are already in force in the North


Sea, English Channel and the Baltic. Similarly the USA and Canada have applied for emission control area status for the waters extending 200 nautical miles from their coasts. Other countries are expected to follow suit. A global limit of 0.5% Sulphur content in the fuel has been proposed from 2020. Hamworthy Krystallon’s scrubber system is an


open loop design that neutralises scrubbed acid gasses using the carbonate/bicarbonate naturally occurring in sea water. Fitted into the ship’s funnel space, the unit can be operated at temperatures of up to 450o The units so far delivered have worked in


C.


combination with diesel engines in the 1MW – 8MW power range, but Krystallon has developed designs to work with engines of up to 67MW.


System diagram of Hamworthy Krystallon’s Sea Water Scrubber and Wash Water Treatment System.


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