search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
OPE N BORDERS BY ANTWAUN SARGENT


This month, Culture Lab Detroit, the annual discussion series founded in 2013 by Jane Schulak that brings together artists, architects and theorists, will explore the idea of how expanding access to public spaces can foster opportunity. Among the speakers is Franklin Sirmans, director of the Pérez Art Museum Miami. “Our institutional identity is inextricably tied to the surrounding community. We seek to be one and the same,” says Sirmans, who will speak on a panel entitled “Sliding Walls: Reimagining the Architecture of Social Space.” For Sirmans, sliding walls are not only about expanding a museum’s


mission. “At Pérez Art Museum Miami, this means outreach, it means public programming, it means making sure all third graders have an experience at the museum with our top-caliber educators,” he says. “This idea could be seen in a museum’s architecture, which includes not just galleries, but also theaters, libraries, classrooms, cafes or spaces designed for leisure.” Eva Franch i Gilabert, executive director and chief curator of


Storefront for Art and Architecture, will also be present at the series as a participant in the “Stones Thrown: Art and Social Progress” program. “Storefront’s mission throughout the years has consistently been to exhibit, produce and connect alternative ideas that challenge the status quo,” she says. “Through our program of exhibitions, events, competitions and publications, we see our role as instigator within the cultural sphere very aligned with the stone thrower, but one that is loaded with very specific vectors of desire. “There are two ways of waging wars: One is by throwing stones and


one is by putting them next to each other. As an architect building cultural edifices, I am interested in both,” Franch i Gilabert continues. She says her remarks will focus on the production of social and collective forms that are not just perpetuations of existing forms of power. “To produce new forms that allow for human and environmental sustainability, that achieve higher levels of freedom and equality, and that empower those not seated at the decision-making table, might take more than just an aesthetic or a rhetoric; it might take a Trojan Horse strategy,” she adds. While discussions around establishing more democratic future forms


internationally take place at the Detroit event, the artist Gary Simmons will present an installation that explores erasure, public nostalgia and how walls can be used to reimagine the built environment. Simmons will reconsider the structures that define everyday interaction by wallpapering a site in the Motor City with musical flypaper, and his installation will incorporate ephemeral promotional posters—some even sourced from Detroit’s techno scene. “The Detroit music scene has always been interesting for me because of its invention and styles of different forms— its Motown, its bands like MC5, its techno and hip-hop. It’s got a great and rich musical tapestry.” “I'm not sure where this inclusive, flexible architecture is headed,” says Sirmans, “but I'm excited.”


86 culturedmag.com


Culture Lab Detroit founder Jane Schulak


PHOTO BY LISA SPINDLER


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196  |  Page 197  |  Page 198  |  Page 199  |  Page 200  |  Page 201  |  Page 202  |  Page 203  |  Page 204  |  Page 205  |  Page 206  |  Page 207  |  Page 208  |  Page 209  |  Page 210  |  Page 211  |  Page 212  |  Page 213  |  Page 214  |  Page 215  |  Page 216  |  Page 217  |  Page 218  |  Page 219  |  Page 220  |  Page 221  |  Page 222  |  Page 223  |  Page 224  |  Page 225  |  Page 226  |  Page 227  |  Page 228  |  Page 229  |  Page 230  |  Page 231  |  Page 232  |  Page 233  |  Page 234  |  Page 235  |  Page 236  |  Page 237  |  Page 238  |  Page 239  |  Page 240  |  Page 241  |  Page 242  |  Page 243  |  Page 244