This book includes a plain text version that is designed for high accessibility. To use this version please follow this link.
97 f


queues outside ice cream parlours or tucking into restaurant meals. EPP is a model of intimate otherness and integration. It doesn’t take over the city. It merges into it…


One of the secrets of its success is its programming policy. Everything happens on a scale which permits the festival-goer to comfortably attend most or all shows, or bunk off. For example, the ice cream-minded can slope off for a scoop or two of lody (‘ice cream’, a Polish word to memorise) or frozen yogurt indulgence and be back two acts later. Why? Poland has ways and flavours to rival Italian gelato culture in terms of simple or guilty pleasures and frozen extravagances.


Naturally, the piwo (beer), on-site or off, is typically good, too.


Lech, the city’s most famous brewery, put the city on Europe’s ‘beer-drinking map’ and there are people willing to pour the local brew for local prices on the green. On the other hand, ‘off-site’, about a 30-minute walk away in the Old Town (Stare Miasto), the light and airy Chmielnik pub (complete with hopyard in the rear garden) on Ulica Zydowska, is a world removed, and a preferred haven for holding meetings, jawing and interviewing. Everything is to be experienced at Polish prices.


point of which is the Old Town Square. Apologies if this sounds like it’s turning into a weekend travel supplement article; the author studied, researched and partook assiduously just for you.


D


Throughout the year the city hosts myriad cultural and trade events; their range and diversity is to marvel at. They range from Gay Pride and the Enea Spring Break Showcase Festival & Confer- ence to the Wieniawski Competitions. In 2017 the Zamek Culture Centre – the location for EPP since 2013 – also held Poland’s first exhibition of works by the Mexican artists Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera, ending in January 2018. The 2018 Design Festival has Biodi- versity as its focus. Even if one sees few non-white faces or signs of multiculturalism in the streets, the city’s outward-reaching world- view is important.


As Marcin Kostaszuk, the deputy director of the local Depart- ment of Culture points out, “Our government in Warsaw is radical-


ly to the right but our mayor in Poznań belongs to a very different party.” Wojciech Mania, project manager at the Poznań Tourism Organisation, adds, “I’m talking from the tourism point of view, of


course… In the Polish political system, local administration, local governments have a lot of independence from central govern- ment, so it produces a lot of tensions on three levels – central, local, and in between, the regional.”


Kostaszuk is reflective about the festival’s ethos and its cultur- al and economic drive. “The economic sense was not one of the main factors for the Zamek cultural centre building this festival. In our country I think the important thing is to create events that bring in ideas from the outside world because after the communist era we were completely closed. We didn’t see anything! 1991 was


own the years the dates when EPP takes place have been concentrated over various long weekends in June (although in 2012 they broke the rule by bump- ing it to August). Sometimes it coincides, as in 2017, with the city’s traditional Saint John’s Fair, the focal


Photo: Jan Plotowski


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148