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NEWS


FED STILL SUPPORTING OFFICERS IMPACTED BY SALISBURY NOVICHOK ATTACK


W


iltshire Police Federation has spoken of its ‘biggest welfare operation’ to date –


supporting officers who were impacted by the Novichok poisoning event in Salisbury.


In March 2018, Russian defector


Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia were left fighting for their lives after being exposed to the deadly nerve agent at their home in the cathedral city. And Detective Sergeant Nick Bailey, who investigated the incident, also spent three weeks seriously ill in hospital after visiting the house. Nick’s family had to leave


their home because of the risk of contamination and all their personal belongings had to be destroyed along with their cars. In October, Nick announced his resignation from policing after 18 years’ service, acknowledging on social media that the


psychological impact of the incident had taken its toll on him. “Although I’ve tried so hard to make it work, I know that I won’t find peace whilst remaining in that environment,” he wrote. Wiltshire Police Federation Chair Mark Andrews has known Nick for almost 20 years. He said: “He has my personal mobile number to call me whenever he needs a chat and that support will continue for as long as he needs it.” Mark continued: “This was such a high-profile incident that it attracted a media circus with journalists camped outside his door, which was distressing for Nick and his family. The Federation was there to ensure his point of view was put across, to keep the media away from the door. We also helped Nick to get the compensation package he deserved and supported him with insurance and his legal claim for injury


at work.” Operation Morlop, which followed


the poisoning, was a gargantuan clean-up mission involving the military which took a year to complete. Officers from Wiltshire and the Met were guarding scenes around the clock, so the Federation provided shelters and refreshment. Wiltshire Federation is still supporting dozens of other officers who have been impacted by the incident, which attracted worldwide attention. Mark continued: “It has been


the biggest ongoing welfare job that Wiltshire Police Federation has ever faced, because of the number of officers who have been impacted by the loss of their rest days through the stress and strain of dealing with the incident or the aftermath. It has been a team effort to make sure our members are looked after.”


Menopause guidelines ‘landing well’, one year on


PFEW Wellbeing and Women’s Lead Hayley Aley is pleased at the way the Federation’s menopause guidance is being rolled out to forces, a year on from its launch. Our National Menopause


Guidelines were a first for policing and laid out strategies for supporting police ofcers and staf going through the menopause in the workplace. Hayley reflected: “I’ve done a lot


of promotional activity, and even went on BBC Breakfast for my five minutes


of fame. The guidelines have landed well, but this is only the first year. There’s still a lot of support needed. “This year we have refreshed


and relaunched the guidelines to try to push them even further to those forces where they haven’t been fully embedded yet. We’re also working on sickness absence reporting so ofcers can tick a specific box for menopause when requesting time away from the workplace.” The next steps for PFEW’s


Menopause Action Group (MAG) includes the roll out of a comprehensive educational toolkit to make sure members have the resources they need. MAG also put together an educational video for World Menopause Day on 18 October. Hayley added: “We also want


to introduce ‘wellbeing passports’ so ofcers don’t have to keep declaring the provision they need. Some forces have implemented this, but it isn’t common practice across the board yet.”


DECEMBER 2020 | POLICE | 15


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