search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
DEVELOPMENT NEWS


“With average economic


growth expected to exceed 8 percent over the medium term, we expect to create at least 200,000 jobs a year.”


Amadou Hott, Minister of Economy, Planning and Cooperation, the Republic of Senegal PHOTO: Agencia Gnews/www.shutterstock.com


THE LOANS IN FOCUS At the 2019 Annual Meetings of the World Bank and the


International Monetary Fund, the OPEC Fund’s Director- General Dr Abdulhamid Alkhalifa signed two loans with Senegal’s Minister of Economy, Planning and Cooperation Amadou Hott:


• US$10 million to support the Agricultural Development and Rural Entrepreneurship Program – Phase II (PADAER II). This program will construct infrastructure for small producers to increase yields and create more jobs, with a focus on women and youth.


Total OPEC Fund loans to Senegal since 1976:


US$223 million


more than


• US$20 million to support the Development of Agricultural Production Areas (PDZP/PNDL). To raise yields, reduce post-harvest losses and facilitate farmers’ access to inputs by developing agricultural value chains and capacity building. Also planned is the upgrading of 550 km of rural access roads.


Since 1976, not including the above, the OPEC Fund has approved 32 Public Sector loans to Senegal totaling more than US$223 million, as well as supporting the country under its Private Sector and Trade Finance lending window. Senegal has also benefited from a number of regional and national grants. Supported sectors include agriculture, education, health, industry, transportation and water and sanitation.


35


PHOTO: BOULENGER Xavier / Shutterstock.com PHOTO: OPEC Fund/Steve Hughes


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47