search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
SPECIAL FEATURE


As part of this project, we learned about more scientific, modern ways of farming


Jagannath Thapaliya


SECTOR: AGRICULTURE PROJECT NAME: COMMUNITY MANAGED IRRIGATED AGRICULTURE SECTOR (PHASE II) FINANCING TYPE: PUBLIC SECTOR LOAN (2015, ONGOING) PARTNERS: NEPAL’S MINISTRY OF ENERGY, WATER RESOURCES AND IRRIGATION (MEWRI) / ADB SITE VISIT: DHADING


This project aims to enhance agricultural productivity and sustainability in central and eastern Nepal by rehabilitating and expanding some 160 irrigation systems. It is expected to benefit 220,000 inhabitants. We traveled to Dhading to learn about an


initiative that enabled local farmers to build an 8 km irrigation pipeline along forbiddingly steep terrain to water their fields. Thal Bahadur Tamang (above right), MEWRI Division Head for the Dhading Province, detailed its impact. “Irrigation is like flesh and blood for farmers,” he said. “Prior to this, these farmers only planted rice and wheat, which provided minimal income. Now they’re able to farm cash crops, which are much more lucrative.” According to Tamang, the farmers pro-actively committed to attend meetings and training sessions to ensure the project’s sustainability. They also formed a Water User Association (WUA) to build and manage seven reservoirs, collect water usage fees and impose fines. Gender and social inclusion is an integral


part of the WUA’s action plan, which prescribes at least 33 percent female membership, the inclusion of disadvantaged groups, and at least one woman in a position of leadership (Chairperson, Treasurer or Secretary). Deepak Pandey (above left), a social


development expert tasked with supporting local level participation told us this particular WUA has 11 female members on its executive board. “We focus on capacity building in three significant ways,” Pandey explained. “Once a project is approved, we raise general awareness with the help of a social mobilizer. We then organize a formal training program – in this case it included 112 participants, 48 percent of whom were women. We also provide the WUA with technical support to revise and implement their rules and regulations.”


Debaki Poudel, Social Mobilizer


“I started discussion groups, collected data on the involvement of women and marginalized groups in the WUA, and helped form two sub-committees to handle complaints and inspections. My communication and social skills have improved significantly. Understanding the


different kinds of people in the community, and getting them to understand me, is a challenging part of my job.”


15


Goma devi Silwal, WUA Treasurer “We can make up to US$3,000 in a good season, and on average, make at least around US$4,000 a year from our crops. With this income, we’re able to send children to school. Living standards, health and hygiene have also improved. We’re constantly working toward sustainability. During dry season we face the problem of forest fires. The irrigation pipelines are exposed and extremely high up in the hills. They’re difficult to reach in case of forest fires. Steel pipes would help as they can withstand fire.”


Jagannath Thapaliya, WUA Member


“We’ve been experiencing extremely dry weather and less


crop growth due to climate change. Even the plants are weak, but as part of this project, we learned about more scientific, modern ways of farming, and received training on diseases and soil testing.”


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60