This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
THE FUTUREBOOK AWARDS SHORTLISTS


Celebrating excellence


Te FutureBook Awards recognise the publishers and initiatives that are pushing the envelope when it comes to innovation. Philip Jones summarises this year’s shortlistees


E 1


ight book tech companies, 15 digital books, 10 marketing/public- ity campaigns, seven platforms and


15 individuals from within the book busi- ness will go head to head for the coveted FutureBook Awards. Te shortlists display excellence and innovation, with the winners announced at the end of the FutureBook Conference on 4th December. Pottermore c.e.o. Susan Jurevics and Quarto c.e.o. Marcus Leaver1


shelf4 ; and the offline initiative HarperCol-


lins BookLab at the Seaport Culture District. In the best digital books categories


Hachette, Nosy Crow and Blink Publishing— with apps for screen personalities Professor Green and Alfie Deyes5


—make up the rump


of the shortlists, with Faber’s Arcadia app6 and HarperCollins’ A Game of Trones also listed, alongside Complex Books’ SESAME Recipe Manager7


. have been nomi-


nated in the Digital Leader category alongside Penguin Random House’s Hannah Telfer; Whitefox founder John Bond; Angela Tribelli, HarperCollins chief marketing officer; and Asi Sharabi, founder of Lost My Name. A new award that recognises digital achievers within the business shortlists Anna Jean Hughes, co-founder and editorial director of Te Pigeonhole; Crystal Mahey- Morgan, founder of OwnIt!; Matt Haslum, consumer marketing director, Faber; Anna Lewis, founder, Valobox; David Eagle, digital services and IT manager at NBN Interna- tional; Laura Cremer2


, digital manager, 2


Octopus; Emily Labram, product manager, HarperCollins; Emma Barnes, founder/c.e.o. of Bibliocloud; and George Burgess, founder and c.e.o. of Gojimo.


3 4


MARKET FORCES Campaigns shortlisted in the Marketing/ Publicity category include HarperCollins for Scrabble Week, a social media push used to promote its Scrabble titles; Canongate’s promotion for Nick Cave’s title Te Sick Bag Song; and Bloomsbury’s Harry Potter Book Night3


initiative. In the Platform of the Year category PRH’s


PelicanBooks.com will slug it out with sister company DKfindout!; as well as FaberMem- bers.com; writers’ platform MacGuffin; Quarto’s personalised cookbook site Tis Is Your Cookbook; the Oxford Learner’s Book-


30 In the separate BookTech category eight


companies have been shortlisted, including familiar names such as Gojimo and Reedsy, alongside more nascent innovations from Oolipo, Ooovre and Shulph (see p12).


LISTEN UP! Audiobooks are also to be included in the FutureBook Awards for the first time. Te audio awards, run in associa- tion with audiobook business Audible, recognise the growing importance of audio in publish- ers’ businesses, as well as their transition to the digital format. Tree awards will be handed out, for Best Frontlist Fiction Audio- book; Best Frontlist Non-Fiction Audiobook, and Best Backlist Audiobook. Shortlists include Audible’s own new dramatisa- tion of Rudyard Kipling’s Te Jungle Book: Te Mowgli Stories, Pan Macmillan’s Poldark, as told by Oliver Hembrough, and Hodder’s Te Churchill Factor, written by Boris Johnson and narrated by Simon Shepherd. Overall, the shortlists reflect the sector:


5 7 6


Judges for the FutureBook Awards include author Peter Meyers;


Sandeep Mahal, former director of The Space; Lisa Edwards, consultant at Redwood Tree Publishing; and journalist and apps specialist Stuart Dredge.


The eight BookTech finalists will


take part in a live pitch-off at the FutureBook Conference in front of a panel of three judges. For more information about the award’s shortlistees, see p12.


imaginative, bold and, at times, ingenious. Te pleasure this year has been scratching beneath the surface of digital publishing, and uncovering a hive of activity that underlines just how this business is changed and chang- ing from root to branch. ×


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32