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MATERIALS | PEX


Right: PEX is commonly used in fire sprinkler systems


Homes decided the full district heating system needed replacing. Using more steel-based piping would have


required residents to be relocated – which was not an option. So, the contractors chose to use Up- onor’s Ecoflex pre-insulated pipe systems. The heating network consisted of a new plant


room installation, plant room piping and replace- ment of the full district heating system. Ecoflex pre-insulated pipe was a perfect fit, due to its increased lifespan and potential for long, joint-free runs – which made it quicker and easier to install. Another reason for choosing it was that it could be run alongside the existing mains, and work in tandem with old mains that were still active. This kept building work disruption to a minimum – and residents in their properties. The installer split the pipe order so the products


were only delivered when required. This meant that for a five-week period – between October and November 2018 – pipe connections were under- taken every 12m across the total pipework run of 1,500m. In total, 2km of pipes were installed into the buildings. “This was a challenging scheme with over 300


Below: Phase I of the Whisper Valley project used more than 95,000m of Rehau’s Raugeo PEX pipe


residential properties on the site relying on the district heating supply to continue providing heating and hot water on demand,” said Richard Farrow, managing director of Sutcliffe Consulting Engineers, which designed the system. “It was not possible to shut the existing heating system down for more than a few hours at a time. Successful design of the system meant it could be installed alongside the existing heating system, requiring only minimal shut down periods to switch over. The Uponor Thermo Twin pipework was selected for its quality and ease of installation.”


Fire rating US-based Viega says that its PureFlow PEX pipes


and fittings have been listed by Underwriters Laboratories (UL) as approved for use in exposed fire sprinkler systems in basements. The UL listings mean builders and contractors can now use PureFlow throughout an entire residential fire sprinkler system. The listing elimi- nates the need for contractors who have used PureFlow PEX throughout a house to join it to pipe of another material in the basement. “Contractors who prefer PureFlow for its easy handling, fast connections and reliability can save time and money now that they can use the system throughout the entire house,” said Seth Larson, product manager at Viega. The listings cover two types of ceiling. PureFlow can be installed and left exposed in wood joist ceiling assemblies when a number of conditions are met, including: joists are of dimensional lumber, engineered wood, wood I-joist or open web wood joists (wood floor trusses); and joists can be exposed after installation. It can also be in- stalled exposed across finished ceiling assemblies, when meeting other conditions. In both cases, conditions include: metal pipe hangers spaced at a maximum of 610mm on centre; and residential automatic sprinklers have a maxi- mum activation temperature rating of 165F (68°C). Viega says that PureFlow is the only PEX fire sprinkler system with an easy alignment bracket that eliminates the need for measuring when hanging pendants.


CLICK ON THE LINKS FOR MORE INFORMATION: � www.rehau.com � www.plasticpipe.orgwww.uponor.com � www.viega.uswww.ul.com


34 PIPE & PROFILE EXTRUSION | November/December 2019 www.pipeandprofile.com


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