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AI could bring forward the diag- nosis by almost two years, which could increase survival rates for thousands. Such an algorithm would need


to be embedded in the clinical system to alert clinicians, sup- porting them to deliver an inter- vention such as sending a patient for screening.


MOVING BEYOND COVID-19 I hope that both clinicians and patients will have seen the huge


benefits of data analytics during the pandemic and that the adop- tion of data-driven technologies can move forward with greater public trust and understanding. Of course, we shouldn’t forget


that progress during the pandem- ic has built on the experience of a number of healthcare econo- mies across the UK that already successfully share information, underpinned by data-sharing agreements that have stood the test of time.


Going forward, an underly-


ing set of ethical principles should underpin all uses of data: that data should only be used to improve patient outcomes, increase healthcare system efficiency, or improve the clini- cian’s delivery of care. Te combination of trust, data


and powerful cloud technology gives us a momentous opportu- nity to deliver rapid insight that can transform the health of all of us. l


Alex Eavis is director of analytics at EMIS and will speak at FutureScot’s Health & Care Transformation on 31 March as part of the Data & AI: Innovating health and care stream. She will be joined by experts from across the industry to discuss the power of artificial intelligence and machine learning in health and care.


Follow Alex on Twitter @AlexandraEavis and the organisation @EMISHealth.


FUTURESCOT | SPRING 2021 | 21


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