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SCAFFTAG


SDL ~ Safety Sign Catalogue 2020 SCAFFOLD TAG


The world’s leading scaffold status tagging system is a unique holder and insert system which ensures instant visibility of your scaffolding status and helps you effi ciently manage your inspection procedures.


• A Scafftag® should be fi tted at all legal access points (normally ladder access from fi rst build to dismantle).


• Holders display a prohibition symbol and the wording “DO NOT USE SCAFFOLD” during erection, awaiting inspection, failure and dismantle stages.


• Scafftag® separately.


Kit contains: 10 Holders, 20 Standard Inserts and 1 Pen – replacement inserts are sold


• We recommend that you use the Wallchart and Pocket Guide (semi-rigid PVC) to accompany your Scafftag® of Scafftag®


KIT CONTENTS


10 x Holders / 20 x Standard Inserts 1 x Pen Replacement Inserts sold separately.


STANDARD INSPECTION INSERT


HOLDER Pack of 10 holders comes with a pen SCAFFTAG®


Code SCF01


Kit POCKET GUIDE KIT Description


Price £58.21


equipment. These will increase the employee knowledge and encourage the use equipment in their routine.


DO NOT USE


SCAFFOLD Ref STSI (st)


© Copyright Brady Corp Ltd Tel: +44(0)845 089 4050 www.scafftag.com Ref. STH


Code


SCF03A SCF03B


vbQOX??VNUNOV??PQYPT??o¢¤ƒ?P WALLCHART 1 3


WC209 Code


Price £22.75


2 Independent Tied Scaffold 5 8


12 4


9 10 15 13 13 13 Extracts from BS EN 12811-1:2003, NASC TG 20:05


Work at Height Regulations 2005, Construction (H.S.&W.) Regs 1996 All components must be undamaged and serviceable


Tubes: Must not be bent, split, or distorted or corroded. 1. 2.


Gin Wheels To be secured on load bearing couplers S.W.L. Clearly marked LOAD NOT TO EXCEED 50 KGS.


Guard Rails (WAHR)


the standards. An intermediate guard rail shall be positioned to limit the gap to 470mm. 3. 4.


Toeboards Min height to150mm fixed on all working platforms.


Boarding To be close boarded and end butted throughout. Overhang of the boards of any thickness should not exceed four times their thickness should not be less than 50mm e.g. detail on 38mm board min. 50mm - max. 150mm.


5. 6. 7.


Transoms Maximum spacing 1.2m BS EN12811-1


Tarpaulins To be fixed only to structures designed for their use. Standards Centres dependent upon duty use.


Duty Very Light Duty Light Duty


General Purpose Heavy Duty


BS 12811-1 Loadin g


Class 1 Class 2 Class 3 Class 4 Class 5 Class 6


8. 9. Ties (BS EN 128811-1)


0.75 kN/m2 1.50 kN/m2 2.00 kN/m2 3.00 kN/m2 4.5 kN/m2 6.0 kN/m2


Standard


Centres 2.7m 2.4m 2.1m 1.8m


Designed Designed


Ledgers Centres not to exceed 2.00m, but base lift may be up to 2.7m max. for passage of pedestrians.


- Types of Ties, Box, Lip, Through, Reveal & Masonry Anchor - Class of Ties, Light Duty 3.5kN in tension Standard 6.1kN in tension Heavy Duty 12.2kN in tension


- Layout, on alternate standards on alterate levels max 4m apart. - Masonry anchor ties should have 5% tested for pull out.


10.


11. 12.


Ledger Joints Not more than 1/3 into a bay and be staggered throughout i.e. Not in adjacent bays or lifts.


Standard Joints Must not occur at same height. Standard/Ledgers


Fixed with right angle couplers.


As the manufacturer, Scafftag recommend that in operation it is the responsibility of the scaffold user to ensure the equipment showing “Safe to Use” and is within the inspection dates. We reserve the right to alter without prior notice any specification


products. SCAFFTAG Systems and Products are registered and copyright protected. ©Scafftag Ltd. 2006


is of our Images for illustration purposes only REF WS01 Rev 11/06


Inspection Reports


Ladders 1


2 3 4 5


Supported on both stiles.


Extend 1.05m above landing point unless alternate handhold provided. Inclined at angle of about 75° or 1 : 4 ratio base to height. Securely tied at head & on a firm & level base.


Never paint wooden pole ladders (defects may be hidden).


14. 15. 16.


Boards: Must not be excessively split, warped or knotted.


Fittings: Must be regularly serviced and maintained. 13.


Minimum height of 950mm on working platforms, secured on the inside of Bracing (BS EN12811-1 & TG 20 : 05) - Ledger, Façade & Plan.


- Ledger bracing should be fixed at alternate pairs of standards in all lifts. Note - All working lifts must be unimpeded therefore the ledger bracing must be removed. Basic design (TG20 : 05) allows for removal of 2 No adjacent levels at one time. - Façade bracing,set at between 35° & 55° and shall be fitted at least every 5 bays. - Plan bracing, at a maximum of 4 lifts and at intervals of not more than 10 bays.


Baseplates Generally placed below standards, and 150mm x 150mm.


Soleplate Use in prescribed circumstances and no smaller than 1,000cm2 beneath any one standard. Access Hierarchy (WAHR)


1. Staircases,


2. Ladder Access Bays with single lift ladders 3. Ladder Access Bays with multiple lift ladders 4. Internal ladder access with a protected ladder trap 5. External ladder access using a safety gate.


Code SCF33


Blue Book Description


Price £28.45


14 11 7 9


Qty.


10 50


Price


£10.44 £46.95


Code SCF28


Price £48.30


Code SCF05


Qty. 5 BLUE BOOK 6


Along with the blue book you will also receive 1 x Scafftag Holder, sample inserts and sample posters.


Price £5.22


100 STORAGE DESIGN LTD TEL:01446772614 www.storage-design.ltd.uk info@storage-design.ltd.uk


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