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business spotlight


by tim parks


SHOP SMALL AT CREEK


Park and then moved to Hillcrest. Next was Sugar, a boutique in Normal Heights, and then his pioneering 16-year-old retail shop, Junc, a South Park staple. He closed up shop in August, fully prepared to retire, until a space he coveted for years became available at 2942 Adams Avenue. Thus, Creek was born and heralds his homecoming to his old stomping grounds of Normal Heights and the return to what he does best, in creating a unique shopping space for his multitude of fol- lowers and new fans alike. The Rage Monthly


F 50


spoke with Parish about his creative vision, and the pros and cons of hav- ing a brick-and-mortar


or over 20 years, Jeffrey Parish has shared his unique vision of what a store can be with San Diegans. First as owner of Le Sorciere, a metaphysi- cal shop that was initially in South


during the age of online shopping. As with any good story, we started at the beginning of why he wanted to go into business for himself, as he explained. “Masochism? Self-imposed distress? Chemical imbalance? Who really knows? But I think back to being about 20 and working at a small flower shop in Larimer Square in downtown Denver,” Parish said. “I remember one evening I was listening to the Bryan Ferry song ‘More Than This.’ It was snowing outside, the light holiday-card kind, and I was standing at the window watching it fall. “I fogged the glass with my breath and drew a question mark with my finger,” he recalled. “I’m pretty sure that’s when the seed was planted that I wanted my own business. It would be about 14 years and some pretty hard knocks before it actually happened though.” Fast forwarding to the present, Parish detailed the


inspiration behind the aesthetic for his latest retail baby. “Creek was born out of the little things that con-


tribute to the larger picture. My love for small spaces, designed with thoughtfully curated special items, natural materials and a sophisticated simplicity has led me here,” he said. “Earthy and calm with a tangible feeling of connection to myself and all the things I love and love to share with you.” “Oh my god, that sounds like a commer- cial! But it’s true. I love creating spaces that evoke a feeling. The layout and design of Creek was inspired by Colorado, my true home, and oddly enough, a beautiful print of a sheep that makes me smile.” With the holiday season upon us, Parish pressed why it’s important for consumers to visit their local mom-and-pop shops.


“Small brick-and-mortar businesses are a dying


breed. It becomes harder and harder for these shops to survive,” he said. “Businesses open and close like a door at the free clinic. Social media and online has become a must.” “Luckily we all have our tribes. Those die-hard fans


of what small businesses do and stand for, the ones that support us all. It makes my heart happy to see new small retailers open. It’s so much nicer to walk down a street and see small businesses run by inde- pendent entrepreneurs,” Parish said. “My advice? Shut off your com-


puter and walk your neigh- borhood. Stop in the little places and buy there. Because the other alternatives


are


cell phone stores, real estate offices, smoke shops and liquor stores. Oh, and Amazon deliv- ery trucks.”


Creek is located at 2942 Adams Avenue and will be open during the holiday season from 11a.m. to 7p.m. Tuesday through Satur- day, and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday; and then will resume regular hours of operation Thursday through Sunday with the aforementioned times. Go to creeksd.com to subscribe to his website and follow them @creeksd on Instagram.


RAGE monthly | December 2019


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