search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
LIVE 24-SEVEN


DIGBY LORD JONES THOUGHTS FOR DECEMBER...


84


I write this epistle as the country moves into full swing for the 2019 General Election. It would be pointless to devote this column to pontificating on the outcome and consequences, since the linking of my copy deadline and the publishing date means you’ll be reading this after the result is known.


But as the runners and riders are withdrawn or declared or just dig in, I am reminded of one of those historical constants that is not only shown up by our Electoral System but also in many other walks of life: The Law of Unintended Consequences.


Take Jim; a long-standing Labour voter in a northern seat who voted Brexit and loathes the metropolitan, hard-left, London-based elite that has taken over the Party for which they and their families have voted for over a century. Jim has made a monumental decision; he is not going to vote for a Party led by Corbyn (“but don’t tell me Dad, he’ll kill me!”). But the snag is that hell will freeze over before he votes Tory. Ah...a solution is riding into town: Nigel Farage and his Brexit Party. And so, in the secrecy of the voting booth, Jim breaks with a century of family tradition, puts his cross in a different box...and promptly elects a Corbyn-supporting Labour MP because the anti-Corbyn vote is thus divided. In the farce of a not-fit-for-purpose, first- past-the-post system of voting that our country calls democracy, that MP then goes to Parliament and supports a Corbyn Leadership, claiming he is


representative of a constituency in which Jim and thousands like him made sure more people actually and actively voted against Corbyn’s Labour than for it. A mixture of the emergence of smaller parties (which first-past-the-post can’t cope with) and a refusal to vote for the Big One leads to... the continued election of the Big One! The Law of Unintended Consequences writ large.


Let us move to another topical aspect of life in the UK right now, in mid-November: Floods.


Our hearts go out to the poor devils in the Don Valley whose possessions, businesses and homes have been ruined by flood water. When billions of pounds have been spent on flood defences since the widespread flooding of 2007, we (and especially they) are entitled to ask how did this happen again? There will be many reasons and each one in isolation will not cause havoc, but a fatal combination of three or four together and the result is painfully there for us all to see, but thankfully not experience. I give you the Law of Unintended Consequences.


Those who campaigned for, and won, a wetland wildlife LIVE24-SEVEN.COM


BUSINE SS LORD DIGBY JONE S


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148