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Lighting the path to productivity and wellbeing By Darren Riva, Northern European Zumtobel Group Services Director


Why upgrade your lighting? Certainly, the energy and cost-savings to be gained from today’s LED luminaires are compelling. But these figures do not tell the whole story. Here, Darren Riva, Northern European Zumtobel Group Services Director, discusses why leading businesses are working closely with lighting specialists to create working environments that prioritise employee productivity and wellbeing. Poor quality lighting can have a negative


impact on employee wellbeing and productivity. Our own internal body clocks are governed by circadian rhythms, and


26 fmuk


studies point to a significant link between lighting quality and the way that these rhythms control sleep, stimulation and relaxation. Working in a poorly lit environment can


lead to lethargy and lack of concentration – not to mention the potential health and safety risks. A recent study from the American Society of Interior Design found that 68 per cent of employees complain about the lighting provision in their offices. Our own neuro-scientific study, in partnership with the acclaimed Gruppe Nymphenburg, revealed that working in an


environment where lighting can be adapted in terms of colour and intensity resulted in lower heart rates, calmer brain activity and less physical tension. This is why leading businesses across


many sectors are partnering with lighting specialists in order to create environments that are safe, efficient and geared towards productivity and optimal employee performance. Daylight is the original light source,


connecting with people through an elementary relationship and shaping human behaviour since the dawn of time. It may not


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