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COUNTRY LIFE IN BC • APRIL 2018 Career options Sale benefits those in need


by MYRNA STARK LEADER WINNIPEG – Agriculture in the Classroom Canada


surveyed 1,000 high school students across the country last fall about careers in agriculture. The survey found that youth want meaningful jobs. Agriculture offers that, giving them a chance to help to feed the world. Their top three career attributes are work that pays, work that is rewarding and meaningful, and work that helps other people.


Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM)


careers have some of the highest appeal to students, notes Becky Parker, program manager for Agriculture in the Classroom Canada. “There is a direct tie between STEM and agriculture but students aren’t aware of that,” says Parker. “If you want to effectively market agri-food careers to youth, we need to start by connecting those careers to STEM and more work needs to be done to improve the perception of agri-food careers with youth.” She advocates mainstreaming careers in agriculture


through the lens of STEM and connecting youth with interesting examples of agri-business, ag science and ag engineering jobs. She says innovation and technological advancements


don’t necessarily mean inventing the next piece of large machinery. A small tool like a corn husker, for instance, can make a difference in countries like Nepal. As a nation where agriculture and food are key elements of the economy, Canada has a responsibility to ensure others have access to food and basic human rights. Parker says it comes back to caring, a value most Canadians are proud to hold. ”A $2 corn sheller or a package of seeds has such a


huge return on investment. It’s a way we can help to support people around the world just as we would hope that if we were in crisis, someone else would help to support us, too,” says Parker.


The annual Farmers Make a Difference Sale benefitting the Canadian Foodgrains Bank was held March 15 at McClary Stockyards in Abbotsford. DAVID SCHMIDT PHOTO


by DAVID SCHMIDT ABBOTSFORD – The 2018 Farmers Make a


Difference Auction at McClary’s Stockyards in Abbotsford, March 15, did not come close to matching last year’s record of $208,000 but still raised about $170,000 for the Canadian Foodgrains Bank. That was enough to make it the second highest-grossing auction ever. As evidenced by the total, the annual


auction continues to receive tremendous support from farmers and the agribusiness community, both in terms of donations and bids, with many items selling for well over their actual value. Proceeds from the sale go to the Canadian


Foodgrains Bank, a multi-denominational Christian charity. The funds are matched 4:1 by the Canadian


International Development Agency, meaning the actual value of the Abbotsford auction was about $850,000. The funds are used to buy Canadian grain which is then distributed by one or more of the member charitable organizations in areas hard hit by drought, wars or natural disasters. While previous auctions have designated


such areas as the Sudan and Ethiopia to receive the relief, a CFB spokesman said no country was specified for this year’s auction. “We will use it in the area of greatest need,”


he said.


of summer BEST PART


It’s the


LARGEST AGRICULTURE SHOWCASE COME CELEBRATE AT BC’S


PNE 4-H FESTIVAL AUGUST 18–21


Off ering over 30 types of project competitions as well as provincial programs for judging, speak and show and educational displays. Travel assistance off ered to clubs outside of the Fraser Valley through the


BC Youth in Agriculture Foundation. ENTRY DEADLINE: JUNE 29, 2018


FARM COUNTRY AUGUST 18–SEPTEMBER 3


Come out and experience BC’s


remarkably diverse agriculture industry. Featuring the crowd favourite Discovery Farm exhibit, pig racing, BC Dairy Association’s Dairy Zone, and


BC Egg Marketing Board’s Egg Laying Exhibit, plus a whole barn full of exciting animal displays.


604-252-3581 • agriculture@pne.ca


PACIFIC SPIRIT HORSE SHOW AUGUST 22–SEPTEMBER 3


Competitions in:


Extreme Trail, Junior Amateur Jumping, Draft Team and Indoor Eventing along with Canadian Horse


Demonstrations and much more! ENTRY DEADLINE: JULY 27, 2018


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