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FOR THE DATA ECONOMY?


UNIX, either directly (Linux, OS X) or indirectly (Microsoft Windows). “Berkeley’s Arpanet turned to the Internet, and


government seeded a lot of what we have in the computer age,” Parris said. While Parris was completing his Ph.D. in electrical


engineering, he helped convert an AT&T digital telephone switch from centralized call processing to distributed processing. Later, at IBM, where he spent more than 20 years of his


career, one of his first software development projects was electronic promotions for merchants to entice us to shop online and encourage us to come back—all via IBM servers. “The first wave of the internet was about connecting


consumers,” he said. “Now we have more than 3 billion people connected on the Internet. By 2020, it will about 7 billion. When you look at the number of machines that will be connected by 2020, it’s roughly about 50 billion things.” That staggering number of connected devices around the world becomes profound when you think the next sets of attacks are going to be attacks on infrastructure, he warned. “Massive attacks that could cripple financial, energy, and


health systems that are all on the Internet because everything has been digitized,” Parris noted. “If we aren’t building the right systems and educating the next generation, who will take the lead?” He asks us to imagine not just the worst-case scenarios of industrial machines—jet engines, power generators, pipelines, and locomotives—connected through the Internet, but to adopt


a digital mindset that embraces what the Industrial Internet can offer in growth opportunities. “To succeed and capitalize on the growth opportunities the


Industrial Internet is creating, industrial companies must not only be deep in software and analytics but also have the physical knowledge to match,” Parris urged. “It’s not enough to have great software. In the complex,


high-tech infrastructure worlds, you must have the deep domain expertise and knowledge of the machines and business operating environments to match,” he said. In the fall of 2014, GE appointed Parris vice president of


software research. He leads software, systems, and analytics experts researching ways data can impact industry, placing him at the forefront of GE’s transformation into a Digital Industrial company through partnerships with GE’s businesses, partners, and clients. Parris’s blogs, talks, speeches and interviews have carried the same message since 2014: The data economy is here. S


For students, Parris has 4 TIPS for success in the data economy:


1. Develop a passion around learning. 2. Spend a couple of hours doing what you’re passionate about. 3. Join support groups; find communities that nurture your passion.


4. Build something.


www.blackengineer.com


DIGITAL ISSUE 2017


I USBE&IT 7


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